Honeywell 4600rp 4600rp, 4600g/4600r, 4800i Commercial/Retail/Industrial Area Imager User’s Guide User Manual To The 6e1c4c38 C2bc 4a4c 98f2 2c53946b467c

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4600rp, 4600g/4600r, 4800i
Commercial/Retail/Industrial Area Imager
User’s Guide
Disclaimer
Honeywell International Inc. (“HII”) reserves the right to make changes in speci-
fications and other information contained in this document without prior notice,
and the reader should in all cases consult HII to determine whether any such
changes have been made. The information in this publication does not repre-
sent a commitment on the part of HII.
HII shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained
herein; nor for incidental or consequential damages resulting from the furnish-
ing, performance, or use of this material.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright.
All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied, repro-
duced, or translated into another language without the prior written consent of
HII.
© 2007-2011 Honeywell International Inc. All rights reserved.
Other product names or marks mentioned in this document may be trademarks
or registered trademarks of other companies and are the property of their
respective owners.
Web Address: www.honeywellaidc.com
Product Agency Compliance
USA
FCC Part 15 Subpart B Class A
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions:
1. This device may not cause harmful interference.
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference
that may cause undesired operation.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when
the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user
will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Use only shielded data cables with this system.
Caution: Any changes or modifications made to this equipment not expressly
approved by Honeywell may void the FCC authorization to operate this
equipment.
UL Statement
UL listed: UL60950-1.
Canada
Industry Canada ICES-003
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003. Operation
is subject to the following conditions:
1. This device may not cause harmful interference.
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference
that may cause undesired operation.
Conformité à la règlementation canadienne
Cet appareil numérique de la Classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du
Canada. Son fonctionnement est assujetti aux conditions suivantes :
1. Cet appareil ne doit pas causer de brouillage préjudiciable.
2. Cet appareil doit pouvoir accepter tout brouillage reçu, y compris le
brouillage pouvant causer un fonctionnement indésirable.
C-UL Statement
C-UL listed: CSA C22.2 No.60950-1-03.
Europe
The CE marking indicates compliance to 2004/108/EC EMC Directive
with Standards EN55022 CLASS A, EN55024, EN61000-3-2,
EN61000-3-3. In addition, complies to 2006/95/EC Low Voltage
Directive, when shipped with recommended power supply.
For further information contact:
Honeywell Imaging & Mobility Europe BV
Nijverheidsweg 9-13
5627 BT Eindhoven
The Netherlands
Honeywell International Inc. shall not be liable for use of our product with
equipment (i.e., power supplies, personal computers, etc.) that is not CE
marked and does not comply with the Low Voltage Directive.
Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment
Information
Honeywell complies with Directive 2002/96/EC OF THE EUROPEAN
PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 27 January 2003 on waste
electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE).
This product has required the extraction and use of natural resources for its
production. It may contain hazardous substances that could impact health
and the environment, if not properly disposed.
In order to avoid the dissemination of those substances in our environment
and to diminish the pressure on the natural resources, we encourage you to
use the appropriate take-back systems for product disposal. Those systems
will reuse or recycle most of the materials of the product you are disposing in
a sound way.
The crossed out wheeled bin symbol informs you that the product
should not be disposed of along with municipal waste and invites you to use
the appropriate separate take-back systems for product disposal.
If you need more information on the collection, reuse, and recycling systems,
contact your local or regional waste administration.
You may also contact your supplier for more information on the
environmental performances of this product.
Germany
GS marked to EN60950-1:2001.
Australia/NZ
C-Tick Statement
Conforms to AS/NZS 3548.
South Korea
This product meets Korean agency approval.
Mexico
Conforms to NOM-019.
International
LED Safety Statement
LEDs have been tested and classified as “EXEMPT RISK GROUP” to the
standard: IEC 62471:2006.
CB Scheme
Certified to CB Scheme IEC 60950-1, Second Edition.
Power Source
Use only a Listed Limited Power Source (LPS) or a Class 2 type power supply
compatible with these models.
Patents
For patent information, refer to www.honeywellaidc.com/patents.
Solids and Water Protection
The 4600g/4600r has a rating of IP41, immunity of foreign particles and dripping
water.
The 4800i has a rating of IP54, immunity of windblown dust penetration and
splashing water.
Warning
To reduce the possibility of heat-related injuries, avoid touching sections
of the scanner that feel warm.
!
i
Chapter 1 - Getting Started
About This Manual ...................................................... 1-1
Unpacking the Imager ................................................. 1-1
Imager Models ............................................................ 1-2
Imager Identification.................................................... 1-3
Connecting the Imager with Keyboard Wedge............ 1-4
Connecting the Imager with USB ................................ 1-5
Connecting the Imager with RS-232 Serial Port ......... 1-6
Connecting the Imager with RS-232 Wedge............... 1-6
Programming the Interface - Plug and Play ................ 1-8
Keyboard Wedge Connection ..................................... 1-8
Laptop Direct Connect........................................... 1-8
USB Connection.......................................................... 1-9
IBM SurePos ......................................................... 1-9
USB PC or Macintosh® Keyboard ....................... 1-10
USB HID.............................................................. 1-10
USB COM Port Emulation................................... 1-10
RS-232 Serial Port Connection ................................. 1-11
Serial Wedge Data Transmission Port ...................... 1-12
IBM 4683 Ports 5B, 9B, and 17 Connection ............. 1-12
Wand Emulation Connection..................................... 1-13
Menu Bar Code Security Settings ............................. 1-14
Reading Techniques ................................................. 1-15
Chapter 2 - Terminal Interfaces
Terminal ID.................................................................. 2-1
Supported Terminals................................................... 2-2
Keyboard Country ....................................................... 2-4
Keyboard Style............................................................ 2-6
Table of Contents
ii
Keyboard Modifiers......................................................2-7
RS-232 Baud Rate...............................................2-10
RS-232 Word Length: Data Bits, Stop Bits,
and Parity .......................................................2-10
RS-232 Receiver Time-Out .................................2-11
RS-232 Handshaking...........................................2-12
Wand Emulation Connection ...............................2-12
Wand Emulation ........................................................2-13
Data Block Size ...................................................2-13
Delay Between Blocks .........................................2-14
Overall Checksum ...............................................2-14
Wand Emulation Transmission Rate ...................2-15
Wand Emulation Polarity .....................................2-15
Wand Emulation Idle............................................2-16
Chapter 3 - Output
Good Read Indicators..................................................3-1
Beeper – Good Read.............................................3-1
Beeper Volume – Good Read................................3-1
Beeper Pitch – Good Read....................................3-2
Beeper Duration – Good Read ..............................3-2
LED – Good Read .................................................3-2
Number of Beeps – Good Read ............................3-2
Good Read Delay ........................................................3-3
User-Specified Good Read Delay................................3-3
Trigger Modes..............................................................3-4
Manual/Serial Trigger ............................................3-4
In-Stand Sensor Mode (4600r only).............................3-5
Scan Stand Mode ........................................................3-6
Scan Stand Symbol ...............................................3-6
Presentation Mode.......................................................3-7
Presentation LED Behavior after Decode..............3-7
Presentation Sensitivity .........................................3-8
Streaming Presentation™ Mode..................................3-8
Image Snap and Ship ..................................................3-9
Hands Free Time-Out..................................................3-9
iii
Reread Delay .............................................................. 3-9
User-Specified Reread Delay.................................... 3-10
LED Power Level ...................................................... 3-10
Illumination Lights ..................................................... 3-11
Imager Time-Out ....................................................... 3-12
Aimer Delay............................................................... 3-12
User-Specified Aimer Delay ................................ 3-12
Aimer Mode............................................................... 3-13
Centering................................................................... 3-13
Decode Search Mode ............................................... 3-15
Preferred Symbology ................................................ 3-15
Output Sequence Overview ...................................... 3-17
Output Sequence Editor...................................... 3-20
Require Output Sequence................................... 3-20
Multiple Symbols ....................................................... 3-20
No Read .................................................................... 3-21
Print Weight............................................................... 3-21
Video Reverse........................................................... 3-22
Working Orientation .................................................. 3-22
Chapter 4 - Data Editing
Prefix/Suffix Overview ................................................. 4-1
To Add a Prefix or Suffix: ...................................... 4-2
To Clear One or All Prefixes or Suffixes:............... 4-3
To Add a Carriage Return Suffix
to all Symbologies............................................ 4-3
Prefix Selections.................................................... 4-4
Suffix Selections.................................................... 4-4
Function Code Transmit........................................ 4-4
Intercharacter, Interfunction,
and Intermessage Delays ......................................... 4-5
Intercharacter Delay.............................................. 4-5
User Specified Intercharacter Delay...................... 4-5
Interfunction Delay ................................................ 4-6
Intermessage Delay .............................................. 4-7
iv
Chapter 5 - Data Formatting
Data Format Editor Introduction...................................5-1
To Add a Data Format ...........................................5-1
Other Programming Selections..............................5-2
Data Format Editor Commands .............................5-2
Data Format Editor ................................................5-5
Data Formatter.......................................................5-5
Alternate Data Formats..........................................5-6
Chapter 6 - Secondary Interface
Secondary RS-232 Connection ...................................6-2
Secondary Code 39 Wand Emulation..........................6-2
Wand Emulation Multi Block........................................6-3
Delay Between Blocks ...........................................6-3
Overall Checksum .................................................6-4
Wand Emulation Transmission Rate .....................6-4
Wand Emulation Polarity .......................................6-5
Wand Emulation Idle..............................................6-5
Data Block Size .....................................................6-5
Secondary Trigger Mode .............................................6-6
Manual/Serial Trigger ............................................6-6
Hands Free Time-Out..................................................6-7
Scan Stand Mode ........................................................6-8
Scan Stand Symbol ...............................................6-8
Presentation Mode.......................................................6-8
Chapter 7 - Symbologies
All Symbologies ..........................................................7-2
Message Length Description .......................................7-2
Codabar ......................................................................7-3
Codabar Concatenation.........................................7-4
Code 39 ......................................................................7-5
Code 32 Pharmaceutical (PARAF) ........................7-7
Full ASCII...............................................................7-7
Code 39 Code Page ..............................................7-8
v
Interleaved 2 of 5 ....................................................... 7-8
Code 93 .................................................................... 7-10
Straight 2 of 5 Industrial ........................................... 7-11
Straight 2 of 5 IATA (Two-Bar Start/Stop) ................ 7-12
Matrix 2 of 5 ............................................................. 7-13
Code 11 .................................................................... 7-13
Code 128 .................................................................. 7-15
ISBT 128 Concatenation ..................................... 7-15
Telepen .................................................................... 7-17
UPC-A ...................................................................... 7-18
UPC-A/EAN-13
with Extended Coupon Code ................................. 7-20
UPC-E0 .................................................................... 7-20
UPC-E1 .................................................................... 7-22
EAN/JAN-13 ............................................................. 7-23
ISBN Translate.................................................... 7-25
EAN/JAN-8 ............................................................... 7-25
MSI ........................................................................... 7-27
Plessey Code ........................................................... 7-28
GS1 DataBar Omnidirectional .................................. 7-29
GS1 DataBar Limited ............................................... 7-29
GS1 DataBar Expanded ........................................... 7-29
PosiCode .................................................................. 7-31
Trioptic Code ............................................................ 7-32
Codablock F ............................................................. 7-32
Code 16K ................................................................. 7-33
Code 49 .................................................................... 7-34
PDF417 .................................................................... 7-35
MicroPDF417 ........................................................... 7-36
GS1 Composite Codes ............................................ 7-36
UPC/EAN Version ............................................... 7-37
GS1 Emulation ......................................................... 7-37
TCIF Linked Code 39 (TLC39) ................................. 7-38
vi
Postal Codes ............................................................7-38
Intelligent Mail Bar Code......................................7-38
Postal-4i...............................................................7-39
Postnet.................................................................7-39
Planet Code .........................................................7-40
British Post...........................................................7-41
Canadian Post .....................................................7-41
Kix (Netherlands) Post.........................................7-41
Australian Post.....................................................7-41
Japanese Post .....................................................7-43
China Post ...........................................................7-43
Korea Post ...........................................................7-44
QR Code ...................................................................7-45
Data Matrix ...............................................................7-46
MaxiCode ..................................................................7-47
Aztec Code ...............................................................7-48
Chinese Sensible (Han Xin) Code ............................7-49
Chapter 8 - Imaging Commands
Single-Use Basis .........................................................8-1
Command Syntax ........................................................8-1
Image Snap - IMGSNP................................................8-2
IMGSNP Modifiers .................................................8-2
Image Ship - IMGSHP .................................................8-5
IMGSHP Modifiers .................................................8-6
Intelligent Signature Capture - IMGBOX....................8-14
IMGBOX Modifiers...............................................8-15
Chapter 9 - OCR Programming
OCR Fonts ..................................................................9-1
OCR.............................................................................9-1
U.S. Currency Font .....................................................9-2
MICR E13 B Font ........................................................9-2
SEMI Font ...................................................................9-3
vii
OCR Templates .......................................................... 9-3
Creating an OCR Template................................... 9-3
Stringing Together Multiple Formats
(Creating “Or” Statements) .............................. 9-5
OCR User-Defined Variables ...................................... 9-6
Reading Multi-Row OCR....................................... 9-7
OCR Check Character ................................................ 9-7
OCR Modulo 10 Check Character......................... 9-8
OCR Modulo 36 Check Character......................... 9-8
OCR User-Defined Check Character .......................... 9-8
Weighting Options................................................. 9-9
OCR ISBN Application Example ............................... 9-11
OCR Template Codes............................................... 9-13
Chapter 10 - Interface Keys
Keyboard Function Relationships ............................. 10-1
Supported Interface Keys.......................................... 10-3
Chapter 11 - Utilities
To Add a Test Code I.D. Prefix to All Symbologies... 11-1
Show Decoder Revision............................................ 11-1
Show Engine Revision .............................................. 11-1
Show Scan Driver Revision....................................... 11-2
Show Software Revision ........................................... 11-2
Show Data Format .................................................... 11-2
Resetting the Standard Product Defaults.................. 11-2
Test Menu ................................................................. 11-3
2D PQA (Print Quality Assessment) ......................... 11-3
2D PQA Reporting............................................... 11-3
Visual Xpress Introduction ........................................ 11-4
Installing Visual Xpress from the Web................. 11-5
Quick*View................................................................ 11-6
Installing Quick*View from the Web .................... 11-6
viii
Chapter 12 - Serial Programming Commands
Conventions...............................................................12-1
Menu Command Syntax ............................................12-1
Query Commands......................................................12-2
Concatenation of Multiple Commands.................12-2
Responses...........................................................12-2
Examples of Query Commands...........................12-3
Trigger Commands....................................................12-4
Resetting the Standard Product Defaults ..................12-4
Menu Commands ......................................................12-4
Chapter 13 - Product Specifications
4600g and 4600r........................................................13-1
4800i..........................................................................13-2
Standard Cable Pinouts.............................................13-3
Keyboard Wedge .................................................13-3
Wand Emulation ..................................................13-4
Serial Output .......................................................13-5
USB .....................................................................13-6
Chapter 14 - Maintenance
Repairs ......................................................................14-1
Maintenance ..............................................................14-1
Cleaning the Device.............................................14-1
Inspecting Cords and Connectors .......................14-1
Replacing the Interface Cable .............................14-2
Troubleshooting.........................................................14-4
Chapter 15 - Customer Support
Technical Assistance.................................................15-1
Online Technical Assistance................................15-1
Product Service and Repair.....................................15-2
Online Product Service and Repair Assistance ...15-3
Limited Warranty........................................................15-3
ix
Appendix A - Reference Charts
Sample Symbols
OCR Programming Chart
Programming Chart
x
1 - 1
1
Getting Started
About This Manual
This User’s Guide provides installation and programming instructions for the
4000 Series imagers. Product specifications, dimensions, warranty, and cus-
tomer support information are also included.
Honeywell bar code imagers are factory programmed for the most common ter-
minal and communications settings. If you need to change these settings, pro-
gramming is accomplished by scanning the bar codes in this guide.
An asterisk (*) next to an option indicates the default setting.
Unpacking the Imager
After you open the shipping carton, take the following steps:
Check for damage during shipment. Report damage immediately to the
carrier who delivered the carton.
Make sure the items in the carton match your order.
Save the shipping container for later storage or shipping.
1 - 2
Imager Models
The chart below lists the interfaces that can be used with your imager. Refer to
Chapter 6 for programming information regarding secondary interfaces.
Models Primary Secondary
4600gXX03XX
4800iXX03XX
True RS-232 True RS-232
4600gXX05XX
4800iXX05XX
Keyboard wedge, TTL level
232, TTL level 232 serial
wedge, IBM 4683, wand emula-
tion, USB keyboard, USB HID,
USB retail (IBM SurePOS),
USB COM port emulation
Wand Emulation, TTL
level 232
4600rXX05XX
4600rpXX05XX
Keyboard wedge, TTL level
232, TTL level 232 serial
wedge, IBM 4683, USB key-
board, USB HID, USB retail
(IBM SurePOS), USB COM
port emulation
TTL level 232
1 - 3
Imager Identification
Compliance
Label location
Item Number,
Serial Number
and Revision
Information
location
1 - 4
Connecting the Imager with Keyboard Wedge
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
An imager can be connected between the keyboard and PC as a “keyboard
wedge,” plugged into the serial port, or connected to a portable data terminal in
wand emulation or non decoded output mode. The following is an example of a
keyboard wedge connection:
1. Turn off power to the terminal/computer.
2. Disconnect the keyboard cable from the back of the terminal/computer.
3. Connect the appropriate interface cable to the imager and to the terminal/
computer.
4. Turn the terminal/computer power back on. The imager beeps.
5. Program the imager for a keyboard wedge interface using the Plug and Play
bar codes beginning on page 1-8.
6. Verify the imager operation by scanning a bar code from the Sample
Symbols in the back of this manual. The imager beeps once.
Your imager is factory programmed for a keyboard wedge interface to an IBM
PC AT with a USA keyboard. If this is your interface and you do not need to
modify the settings, skip to Chapter 3 - Output.
1 - 5
Connecting the Imager with USB
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
An imager can be connected to the USB port of a computer.
1. Connect the appropriate interface cable to the imager first, then to the com-
puter.
2. Program the imager for a USB interface using the Plug and Play bar codes
beginning on page 1-9.
3. The imager beeps.
4. Verify the imager operation by scanning a bar code from the Sample
Symbols in the back of this manual.
For additional USB programming and technical information, refer to “USB Appli-
cation Note,” available at www.honeywellaidc.com.
1 - 6
Connecting the Imager with RS-232 Serial Port
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
1. Turn off power to the terminal/computer.
2. Connect the appropriate interface cable to the imager.
Note: For the imager to work properly, you must have the correct cable for your
type of terminal/computer.
3. Plug the serial connector into the serial port on your computer. Tighten the
two screws to secure the connector to the port.
4. Plug the power supply into the cable.
5. Once the imager has been fully connected, power up the computer.
6. Program the imager for an RS-232 Serial Port interface using the Plug and
Play bar code on page 1-11.
Connecting the Imager with RS-232 Wedge
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Your imager uses True and TTL signal levels to wedge into an RS-232 serial
network. Use only serial wedge cables to prevent damage to the imager. Refer
to RS-232 Baud Rate on page 2-10 to set the baud rate and communications
protocol.
1 - 7
1. Turn off power to the computer.
2. Disconnect the existing serial cable from the computer.
3. Connect the appropriate interface cable to the imager.
Note: For the imager to work properly, you must have the correct cable for your
type of computer.
4. Plug the serial connector into the serial port on your computer. Tighten the
two screws to secure the connector to the port.
5. Plug the other serial connector into the host connection and tighten the two
screws.
6. Plug the power pack cable into the receptor on the imager cable.
7. Plug the power pack into a power source.
8. Once the imager has been fully connected, power up the computer.
9. To set up the serial wedge terminal ID, use the serial terminal ID 050 and
follow the instructions on page 2-1.
10. Program the port for data transmission using the bar codes on page 1-12.
Host
Terminal
1 - 8
Programming the Interface - Plug and Play
Plug and Play bar codes provide instant imager set up for commonly used inter-
faces.
Note: After you scan one of the codes, power cycle the host terminal to have
the interface in effect.
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Keyboard Wedge Connection
If you want your system programmed for an IBM PC AT and compatibles key-
board wedge interface with a USA keyboard, scan the bar code below. Key-
board wedge is the default interface.
Laptop Direct Connect
For most laptops, scanning the
Laptop Direct Connect
bar code allows opera-
tion of the imager in parallel with the integral keyboard. The following Laptop
Direct Connect bar code also programs a carriage return (CR) suffix, and turns
on Emulate External Keyboard (page 2-7).
IBM PC AT and Compatibles
with CR suffix
Laptop Direct Connect
with CR suffix
1 - 9
USB Connection
IBM SurePos
Scan one of the following “Plug and Play” codes to program the imager for IBM
SurePos (USB handheld imager) or IBM SurePos (USB Tabletop imager).
Note: After scanning one of these codes, you must power cycle the cash
register.
Each bar code above also programs the following suffixes for each symbology:
Symbology Suffix
EAN-8 0C
EAN-13 16
UPC-A 0D
UPC-E 0A
Code 39 00 0A 0B
Interleaved 2 of 5 00 0D 0B
Code 128 00 18 0B
IBM SurePos
(USB Handheld Imager)
Interface
IBM SurePos
(USB Tabletop Imager)
Interface
1 - 10
USB PC or Macintosh
®
Keyboard
Scan one of the following codes to program the imager for USB PC Keyboard or
USB Macintosh Keyboard. Scanning these codes adds a CR and selects the
terminal ID (USB PC Keyboard - 124, USB Macintosh Keyboard - 125).
USB HID
Scan the following code to program the imager for USB HID bar code imagers.
Scanning this code changes the terminal ID to 131.
USB COM Port Emulation
Scan the following code to program the imager to emulate a regular RS-232-
based COM port. If you are using a Microsoft® Windows® PC, you will need to
download a driver from the Honeywell website ( www.honeywellaidc.com). The
driver will use the next available COM port number. Apple® Macintosh comput-
ers recognize the imager as a USB CDC class device and automatically use a
class driver. Scanning the code below changes the terminal ID to 130.
Note: No extra configuration (e.g., baud rate) is necessary.
USB Keyboard (PC)
USB Keyboard (Mac)
USB Japanese Keyboard (PC)
USB HID Bar Code Imager
USB COM Port Emulation
1 - 11
CTS/RTS Emulation
ACK/NAK Mode
RS-232 Serial Port Connection
All communication parameters between the imager and terminal must match for
correct data transfer through the serial port using RS-232 protocol. Scanning
the RS-232 interface bar code programs the imager for an RS-232 interface at
38,400 baud, parity–none, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and adds a suffix of a CR LF.
On
* Off
On
* Off
RS-232 Interface
1 - 12
Serial Wedge Data Transmission Port
Using the following bar codes, set the port to which you want the scanned data
to transmit. Port 1 corresponds to P1 on the output cable and Port 2 corre-
sponds to P2 on the output cable. Choosing Both sends scanned data to P1
and P2.
Default = P1.
IBM 4683 Ports 5B, 9B, and 17 Connection
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Scan one of the following “Plug and Play” codes to program the imager for IBM
4683 Port 5B, 9B, or 17.
Note: After scanning one of these codes, you must power cycle the cash
register.
* P1
P2
Both P1 and P2
IBM 4683 Port 5B Interface
IBM 4683 Port 9B
HHBCR-1 Interface
IBM 4683 Port 17 Interface
1 - 13
Each of the previous bar codes also programs the following suffixes for each
symbology:
.
The IBM 4683 Port 9B HHBCR-2 Interface bar code also programs the follow-
ing suffixes for each symbology:
Wand Emulation Connection
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
In Wand Emulation mode, the imager decodes the bar code then sends data in
the same format as a wand imager. The Code 39 Format converts all symbolo-
gies to Code 39.
The Same Code Format transmits UPC, EAN, Code 128, Codabar, and Inter-
leaved 2 of 5 without any changes, but converts all other symbologies to Code
39. 2D symbologies are converted to Code 128.
The
Wand Emulation Plug & Play (Code 39 Format)
bar code below sets the
terminal ID to 61. The
Wand Emulation Plug & Play Same Code
bar code
sets the terminal ID to 64. These bar codes also set the Transmission Rate to
Symbology Suffix
EAN-8 0C
EAN-13 16
UPC-A 0D
UPC-E 0A
Code 39 00 0A 0B
Interleaved 2 of 5 00 0D 0B
Code 128 00 0A 0B
Symbology Suffix
EAN-8 0C
EAN-13 16
UPC-A 0D
UPC-E 0A
Code 39 00 0A 0B
Interleaved 2 of 5 00 0D 0B
Code 128 00 18 0B
IBM 4683 Port 9B HHBCR-2 Interface
1 - 14
25 inches per second, Output Polarity to black high, and Idle State to high. (If
you want to change the terminal ID
only
, without changing any other imager set-
tings, refer to Terminal ID on page 2-1.)
Menu Bar Code Security Settings
Honeywell 2D imagers are programmed by scanning menu bar codes or by
sending serial commands to the imager. If you want to restrict the ability to
scan menu codes, you can use the Menu Bar Code Security settings. Contact
the nearest technical support office (see Technical Assistance on page 15-1)
for further information.
Wand Emulation
Plug & Play
Same Code
Wand Emulation
Plug & Play
(Code 39 Format)
1 - 15
Reading Techniques
The imager has a view finder that projects a bright red or green aiming beam
that corresponds to the imager’s horizontal field of view. The aiming beam
should be centered over the bar code, but it can be positioned in any direction
for a good read.
The aiming beam is smaller when the imager is closer to the code and larger
when it is farther from the code. Symbologies with smaller bars or elements (mil
size) should be read closer to the unit. Symbologies with larger bars or ele-
ments (mil size) should be read farther from the unit. To read single or multiple
symbols (on a page or on an object), hold the imager at an appropriate distance
from the target, pull the trigger, and center the aiming beam on the symbol. If
the code being scanned is highly reflective (e.g., laminated), it may be neces-
sary to tilt the code +5° to prevent unwanted reflection.
1 - 16
2 - 1
2
Terminal Interfaces
Terminal ID
If your interface is not covered by a Plug and Play bar code from Chapter 1,
then refer to Supported Terminals on page 2-2 through page 2-3, and locate the
Terminal ID number for your PC. Scan the Terminal ID bar code below, then
scan the numeric bar code(s) from the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual to program the imager for your terminal ID. Scan Save to
save your selection.
For example, an IBM AT terminal has a Terminal ID of 003. You would scan the
Terminal ID bar code, then 0, 0, 3 from the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual, then Save. If you make an error while scanning the digits
(before scanning Save), scan the Discard code on the Programming Chart,
scan the Terminal ID bar code, scan the digits, and the Save code again.
Note: After scanning one of these codes, you must power cycle your computer.
Terminal ID
Save
2 - 2
Supported Terminals
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Terminal Model(s) Terminal
ID
DDC 3496, 3497, 122 key 005
DDC 3496, 3497, 102 key 071
DEC VT510, 520, 525 (PC style) 084
DEC VT510, 520, 525 (DEC style
LK411) 104
Esprit 200, 400 005
Heath Zenith PC, AT 003
Heath Zenith 090
HP Vectra 003
HP Vectra 023
IBM XT 001
IBM PS/2 25, 30, 77DX2 002
IBM AT, PS/2 30–286, 50, 55SX, 60,
70, 70–061, 70–121, 80 003 *
IBM 102 key 3151, 3161, 3162, 3163, 3191,
3192, 3194, 3196, 3197, 3471,
3472, 3476, 3477
006
IBM 122 key 3191, 3192, 3471, 3472 007
IBM 122 key 3196, 3197, 3476, 3477, 3486,
3482, 3488 008
IBM 122 key 3180 024
IBM 122 key 3180 data entry keyboard 114
IBM DOS/V 106 key PC & Workstation 102
IBM SurePOS USB Handheld Imager 128*
IBM SurePOS USB Tabletop Imager 129*
IBM Thinkpad 360 CSE, 340, 750 097
IBM Thinkpad 106
IBM Thinkpad 365, 755CV 003
I/O 122 key 2676D, 2677C, 2677D 008
ITT 9271 007
Lee Data IIS 007
NEC 98XX Series 103
Olivetti M19, M200 001
Olivetti M240, M250, M290, M380,
P500 003
RS-232 True 000**
RS-232 TTL 000
2 - 3
* Default for 4600g/4600r/4600rp/4800iXX 05XX models. It is best to use the Plug and
Play bar codes, beginning on page 1-9, to program these interfaces, rather than scan-
ning the terminal ID listed in this table.
** Default for 4600g/4800iXX 03XX models
Serial Wedge 050
Silicon Graphics Indy, Indigoll 005
Telex 88 key 078, 078A, 79, 80, 191, 196,
1191,1192, 1471, 1472, 1476,
1477, 1483
025
Telex 88 key Data Entry Keyboard 112
Telex 102 key 078, 078A, 79, 80, 191, 196,
1191,1192, 1471, 1472, 1476,
1477, 1483
045
Telex 122 key 078, 078A, 79, 80, 191, 196,
1191,1192, 1471, 1472, 1476,
1477, 1482, 1483
046
USB COM Port Emulation 130
USB Japanese Keyboard
(PC) 134
USB PC Keyboard 124*
USB Mac Keyboard 125*
USB HID POS 131*
Wand Emulation (Code 39
Format) 061
Wand Emulation (Same
Code Format) 064
Supported Terminals
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Terminal Model(s) Terminal
ID
2 - 4
Keyboard Country
Scan the appropriate country code below to program the keyboard for your
country. As a general rule, the following characters are supported, but need
special care for countries other than the United States:
@ | $ # { } [ ] = / ‘ \ < > ~
* United States
Brazil
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland (Sweden)
France
Germany/Austria
Greece
Hungary
Belgium
Canada (French)
Israel (Hebrew)
2 - 5
Keyboard Country (continued)
Latin America
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
SCS
Slovakia
Italy
Netherlands (Dutch)
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland (German)
2 - 6
Keyboard Country (continued)
Refer to the Honeywell website (www.honeywellaidc.com) for complete key-
board country support information and applicable interfaces. If you need to pro-
gram a keyboard for a country other than one listed above, scan the Program
Keyboard Country bar code below, then scan the numeric bar code(s) for the
appropriate country from the inside back cover, then the Save bar code.
Keyboard Style
This programs keyboard styles, such as Caps Lock and Shift Lock.
Default =
Regular.
Regular is used when you normally have the Caps Lock key off.
Caps Lock
is used when you normally have the Caps Lock key on.
Turkey Q
U.K.
Turkey F
Program Keyboard Country
* Regular
Caps Lock
2 - 7
Shift Lock
is used when you normally have the Shift Lock key on (not common
to U.S. keyboards).
Automatic Caps Lock
is used if you change the Caps Lock key on and off.
The software tracks and reflects if you have Caps Lock on or off (AT and PS/2
only). This selection can only be used with systems that have an LED which
notes the Caps Lock status.
Autocaps via NumLock
bar code should be scanned in countries (e.g., Ger-
many, France) where the Caps Lock key cannot be used to toggle Caps Lock.
The NumLock option works similarly to the regular Auotcaps, but uses the Num-
Lock key to retrieve the current state of the Caps Lock.
Emulate External Keyboard should be scanned if you do not have an external
keyboard (IBM AT or equivalent).
Note: After scanning the Emulate External Keyboard bar code, you must power
cycle your computer.
Keyboard Modifiers
This modifies special keyboard features, such as CTRL+ ASCII codes and
Turbo Mode.
Control + ASCII Mode On
:
The imager sends key combinations for ASCII con-
trol characters for values 00-1F. Windows is the preferred mode. All keyboard
country codes are supported. DOS mode is a legacy mode, and it does not
Shift Lock
Automatic Caps Lock
Autocaps via NumLock
Emulate External Keyboard
2 - 8
support all keyboard country codes. New users should use the Windows mode.
Refer to Keyboard Function Relationships, page 10-1 for CTRL+ ASCII Values.
Default = Off.
Turbo Mode: The imager sends characters to a terminal faster. If the terminal
drops characters, do not use Turbo Mode.
Default = Off.
Numeric Keypad Mode
:
Sends numeric characters as if entered from a
numeric keypad.
Default = Off.
Windows Mode Control + ASCII
Mode On
* Control + ASCII Mode Off
DOS Mode Control + ASCII Mode On
Turbo Mode On
* Turbo Mode Off
Numeric Keypad Mode On
* Numeric Keypad Mode Off
2 - 9
Automatic Direct Connect Mode:
This selection can be used if you have an
IBM AT style terminal and the system is dropping characters.
Default = Off.
Automatic Direct
Connect Mode On
* Automatic Direct Connect
Mode Off
2 - 10
RS-232 Baud Rate
Baud Rate sends the data from the imager to the terminal at the specified rate.
The host terminal must be set for the same baud rate as the imager.
Default = 38,400.
RS-232 Word Length: Data Bits, Stop Bits, and Parity
Data Bits sets the word length at 7 or 8 bits of data per character. If an applica-
tion requires only ASCII Hex characters 0 through 7F decimal (text, digits, and
punctuation), select 7 data bits. For applications which require use of the full
ASCII set, select 8 data bits per character.
Default = 8.
Stop Bits sets the stop bits at 1 or 2.
Default = 1.
300
2400
600
1200
4800
* 38400
9600
19200
115,200
57,600
2 - 11
Parity provides a means of checking character bit patterns for validity.
Default = None.
RS-232 Receiver Time-Out
The unit stays awake to receive data until the RS-232 Receiver Time-Out
expires. A manual or serial trigger resets the time-out. When an RS-232
receiver is sleeping, a character may be sent to wake up the receiver and reset
the time-out. A transaction on the CTS line will also wake up the receiver. The
receiver takes 300 milliseconds to completely come up. Change the RS-232
7 Data, 1 Stop, Parity Even
7 Data, 1 Stop, Parity None
7 Data, 1 Stop, Parity Odd
7 Data, 2 Stop, Parity Odd
7 Data, 2 Stop, Parity Even
7 Data, 2 Stop Parity None
* 8 Data, 1 Stop, Parity None
8 Data, 1 Stop, Parity Even
8 Data, 1 Stop, Parity Odd
2 - 12
receiver time-out by scanning the bar code below, then scanning digits from the
inside back cover of this manual, then scanning
Save
. The range is 0 to 300
seconds.
Default = 0 seconds (no time-out - always on).
RS-232 Handshaking
RS-232 Handshaking allows control of data transmission from the imager using
software commands from the host device. When this feature is turned
Off
, no
data flow control is used. When Data Flow Control is turned
On
, the host
device suspends transmission by sending the XOFF character (DC3, hex 13) to
the imager. To resume transmission, the host sends the XON character (DC1,
hex 11). Data transmission continues where it left off when XOFF was sent.
Default = RTS/CTS, XON/XOFF and ACK/NAK Off
.
Wand Emulation Connection
The Wand Emulation Connection bar codes should be used if you want to
change the terminal ID
only
, without changing any other imager settings. We
recommend using Wand Emulation Plug & Play bar codes to program your
imager to emulate a wand reader. The Wand Emulation Plug & Play bar codes
change other parameters, in addition to changing the terminal ID.
In Wand Emulation mode, the imager decodes the bar code then sends data in
the same format as a wand imager. The Code 39 Format converts all symbol-
ogies to Code 39.
RS-232 Receiver Time-Out
RTS/CTS On
* XON/OFF Off
* RTS/CTS Off
XON/XOFF On
ACK/NAK On
* ACK/NAK Off
2 - 13
The Same Code Format transmits UPC, EAN, Code 128, Codabar, and Inter-
leaved 2 of 5 without any changes, but converts all other symbologies to Code
39. 2D symbologies are converted to Code 128.
The Code 39 Format bar code below sets the terminal ID to 61, and the Same
Code Format bar code sets the terminal ID to 64.
Default = Code 39 Format.
Wand Emulation
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 1-2 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Note: Changing primary wand emulation settings also changes the secondary
wand emulation settings (see Secondary Code 39 Wand Emulation on
page 6-2).
Data Block Size
This transmits the data in smaller blocks to prevent buffer overflow.
Default =
40.
Code 39 Format
Same Code Format
20
80
* 40
60
2 - 14
Delay Between Blocks
This sets the delay time between data blocks.
Default = 50ms.
Overall Checksum
When this option is turned on, a computed check character is added at the end
of the entire message. The check character is the character which when Exclu-
sive-OR’d with every preceding character of the message yields a result of 0x00
(00H).
Default = Off.
5ms
500ms
* 50ms
150ms
On
* Off
2 - 15
Wand Emulation Transmission Rate
The Transmission Rate is limited by the terminal’s ability to receive data without
dropping characters.
Default = 25 inches/second.
Wand Emulation Polarity
The Polarity can be sent as standard with black bars high, or reversed with
white bars high.
Default = Black High.
10
80
* 25
40
120
150
200
* Black High
White High
2 - 16
Wand Emulation Idle
The idle describes the state of the imager when no data is being transmitted.
When in Wand Emulation mode, you must set the imager’s idle state to match
the idle state for the device to which the imager is connected.
Default = Idle
High
.
* Idle High
Idle Low
3 - 1
3
Output
Good Read Indicators
Beeper – Good Read
The beeper may be programmed
On
or
Off
in response to a good read. Turning
this option off, only turns off the beeper response to a good read indication. All
error and menu beeps are still audible.
Default = On.
Beeper Volume – Good Read
The beeper volume codes modify the volume of the beep the imager emits on a
good read.
Default = Medium for the 4600g/4600r/4600rp; High for the 4800i.
* On
Off
High
Medium
Off
Low
3 - 2
Beeper Pitch – Good Read
The beeper pitch codes modify the pitch (frequency) of the beep the imager
emits on a good read.
Default = Medium.
Beeper Duration – Good Read
The beeper duration codes modify the length of the beep the imager emits on a
good read.
Default = Normal.
LED – Good Read
The LED indicator can be programmed
On
or
Off
in response to a good read.
Default = On.
Number of Beeps – Good Read
The number of beeps of a good read can be programmed from 1 - 9. The same
number of beeps will be applied to the beeper and LED in response to a good
read. For example, if you program this option to have five beeps, there will be
five beeps and five LED flashes in response to a good read. The beeps and
Low (1600 Hz)
* Medium (3250 Hz)
High (4200 Hz)
* Normal Beep
Short Beep
* On
Off
3 - 3
LED flashes are in sync with one another. To change the number of beeps,
scan the bar codebar code below and then scan a digit (1-9) bar code and the
Save bar code on the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual.
Default = One.
Good Read Delay
This sets the minimum amount of time before the imager can read another bar
code.
Default = No Delay.
User-Specified Good Read Delay
If you want to set your own length for the good read delay, scan the bar code
below, then set the delay (from 0-30,000 milliseconds) by scanning digits from
the inside back cover, then scanning Save.
Number of Pulses
* No Delay
Short Delay (500 ms)
Medium Delay (1,000 ms)
Long Delay (1,500 ms)
User-Specified Good Read Delay
3 - 4
Trigger Modes
Manual/Serial Trigger
You can activate the imager either by pressing the trigger, or using a serial trig-
ger command (see Trigger Commands on page 12-4). When in manual trigger
mode, the imager scans until a bar code is read, or until the trigger is released.
When in serial mode, the imager scans until a bar code has been read or until
the deactivate command is sent. The imager can also be set to turn itself off
after a specified time has elapsed (see Read Time-Out, which follows).
Read Time-Out
Use this selection to set a time-out (in milliseconds) of the imager’s trigger when
using serial commands to trigger the imager, or if the imager is in manual trigger
mode. Once the imager has timed out, you can activate the imager either by
pressing the trigger or using a serial trigger command. After scanning the Read
Time-Out bar code, set the time-out duration (from 0-300,000 milliseconds) by
scanning digits from the inside back cover, then scanning Save.
Default =
30,000.
Manual Trigger, Low Power
Note: Does not apply to the 4600r.
The imager powers down until the trigger is pulled. When the trigger is pulled,
the imager powers up and operates until there is no triggering for the time set
with the Low Power Time-Out bar code below. There is a delay of up to one
second in operation when the imager is first triggered, but there is no delay
when operating in low power time-out mode.
Note: Manual Trigger, Low Power cannot be used with keyboard wedge
applications.
* Manual/Serial Trigger
Read Time-Out
Manual Trigger, Low Power
3 - 5
Low Power Time-Out Timer
Scan the Low Power Time-Out bar code to change the time-out duration (in
seconds). Then scan the time-out duration (from 0-300 seconds) from the
inside back cover, and Save.
Default = 120 seconds.
If the unit remains idle during the low power time-out interval, the unit goes into
low power mode. Whenever the trigger is enabled, the low power time-out timer
is reset.
Note: This time-out does not begin until the imager time-out setting has expired.
In-Stand Sensor Mode (4600r only)
Note: This feature is only applicable to the flex stand with sensor
(HFSTAND5RSE) used with a 4600r, software revision 31205480-118 or
higher. To determine whether you have the correct hardware and
software, scan the Sensor On bar code. If it triple beeps, your device
does not have this capability.
This feature tells a 4600r to sense when the scanner is removed from the stand
and to begin manual triggering. When you scan Sensor On, the imager goes
into manual trigger mode when it is removed from the stand. For example, if
the 4600r is programmed for Presentation Mode (page 3-7), it would be in pre-
sentation mode whenever it is in the stand, and in manual trigger mode when-
ever it is removed from the stand.
Default = Sensor Off.
Low Power Time-Out
Sensor On
* Sensor Off
3 - 6
Scan Stand Mode
When a unit is in Scan Stand mode, it remains idle as long as it sees the Scan
Stand symbol (see below). When a different code is presented, the imager is
triggered to read the new code.
Note: The imager automatically adjusts the illumination LEDs to the lowest light
level possible to maintain a good lock on the Scan Stand symbol. When
a symbol is presented, the imager’s light levels adjust to the saved setting
(see LED Power Level on page 3-10). This mode requires at least 50 lux
of ambient light to operate correctly.
Scan Stand Symbol
When a unit is in Scan Stand mode, the LEDs shine at the Scan Stand symbol
on the base of the stand which tells it to remain idle.
When the Scan Stand
symbol is covered, the imager turns the LEDs on at the configured power level
(default setting is high) and attempts to find and decode bar codes in its field of
view.
Scan Stand Mode
Scan Stand Symbol
3 - 7
Presentation Mode
This programs the imager to work in Presentation mode. The LEDs are either
off or at the lowest power for ambient conditions until a bar code is presented to
the imager. Then the LEDs turn on automatically to read the code. Presenta-
tion Mode uses ambient light to detect the bar codes. If the light level in the
room is not high enough, Presentation Mode may not work properly.
Note: The operation of advanced illumination units and non-advanced
illumination units differs slightly. When an advanced illumination unit is in
Presentation Mode and idle, the illumination LEDs go dim, but never go
out. When a non-advanced illumination unit is in Presentation Mode and
idle, the illumination LEDs go out completely.
Presentation LED Behavior after Decode
When an imager is in presentation mode, the LEDs remain on and continue
scanning for a short time after a bar code is decoded. If you wish to turn the
LEDs off immediately after a bar code is decoded, scan the LEDs Off bar code,
below.
Default = LEDs On.
Presentation Mode
Non-Advanced
Illumination Unit Advanced
Illumination Unit
* LEDs On
LEDs Off
3 - 8
Presentation Sensitivity
Presentation Sensitivity is a numeric range that increases or decreases the
imager's reaction time to bar code presentation. To set the sensitivity, scan the
Sensitivity bar code, then scan the degree of sensitivity (from 0-20) from the
inside back cover, and Save. 0 is the most sensitive setting, and 20 is the least
sensitive.
Default = 1.
Streaming Presentation
Mode
When in Streaming Presentation mode, the imager’s aimer goes out after a
short time, but the scan illumination remains on all the time to continuously
search for bar codes.
When using Preferred Symbology (page 3-15), a lower priority symbol must be
centered on the aiming pattern to be read in Streaming Presentation Mode.
Note: Streaming Presentation Mode applies only to advanced illumination units.
Sensitivity
Streaming Presentation Mode
Non-Advanced
Illumination Unit Advanced
Illumination Unit
3 - 9
Image Snap and Ship
Image Snap and Ship tells the imager to take a picture (rather than read a bar
code) when the trigger is pressed. Once the picture is snapped, it is shipped to
the host system as a jpeg file by default. To revert to bar code reading, you
must change to a different trigger mode (see Trigger Modes beginning on page
3-4).
Hands Free Time-Out
The Scan Stand, and Presentation, and Streaming Presentation Modes are
referred to as “hands free” modes. If the imager’s trigger is pulled when using a
hands free mode, the imager changes to manual trigger mode. You can set the
time the imager should remain in manual trigger mode by setting the Hands
Free Time-Out. Once the time-out value is reached, (if there have been no fur-
ther trigger pulls) the imager reverts to the original hands free mode.
Scan the Hands Free Time-Out bar code, then scan the time-out duration
(from 0-300,000 milliseconds) from the inside back cover, and Save.
Default =
5,000 ms.
Reread Delay
This sets the time period before the imager can read the
same
bar code a sec-
ond time. Setting a reread delay protects against accidental rereads of the
same bar code. Longer delays are effective in minimizing accidental rereads.
Use shorter delays in applications where repetitive bar code scanning is
required.
Default = Medium.
Image Snap and Ship
Hands Free Time-Out
3 - 10
Reread Delay only works when in Presentation Mode or Streaming
Presentation™ Mode (page 3-8).
User-Specified Reread Delay
If you want to set your own length for the reread delay, scan the bar code below,
then set the delay (from 0-30,000 milliseconds) by scanning digits from the
inside back cover, then scanning Save.
LED Power Level
This selection allows you to adjust LED and aimer brightness. Off is used when
no illumination is needed. Low is used if low illumination is sufficient. High (the
default) is the brightest setting.
Short (500 ms)
* Medium (750 ms)
Long (1000 ms)
Extra Long (2000 ms)Extra Long (2000 ms)
User-Specified Reread Delay
3 - 11
If you have an aimer delay programmed (see Aimer Delay on page 3-12), the
aimer will be at 100% power during the delay, regardless of the LED Power
Level.
Note: If you scan the Off bar code, both the aimer and illumination lights turn
off, making it impossible to scan bar codes in low light. To turn the LED
Power Level back on, move to a brightly lit area and scan either the Low
or the High bar code below.
Illumination Lights
If you want the illumination lights on while reading a bar code, scan the Lights
On bar code, below. However, if you want to turn just the lights off, scan the
Lights Off bar code.
Default = Lights On.
Note: This setting does not affect the aimer light. The aiming light can be set
using Aimer Mode (page 3-13).
Off
Low (50%)
* High (100%)
Lights Off
* Lights On
3 - 12
Imager Time-Out
Imager Time-Out powers down the imager after the unit has been idle for the
specified time. To prevent the imager from powering down, set this time-out to
0. Scan Imager Time-Out, then set the time-out by scanning digits (from 0 -
999,999 ms) from the inside back cover, then scanning Save.
Default = 60,000
ms.
Note: The default applies to firmware with a base number of 31205480. Refer
to the Show Software Revision on page 11-2 for information on
determining the firmware revision in your unit.
Aimer Delay
The aimer delay allows a delay time for the operator to aim the imager before
the picture is taken. Use these codes to set the time between when the trigger
is pulled and when the picture is taken. During the delay time, the aiming light
will appear, but the LEDs won’t turn on until the delay time is over.
Default =
Off.
User-Specified Aimer Delay
If you want to set your own length for the duration of the delay, scan the bar
code below, then set the time-out by scanning digits (0 - 4,000 ms) from the
Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual, then scan Save.
Imager Time-Out
400 milliseconds
* Off
(no delay)
200 milliseconds
Delay Duration
3 - 13
Aimer Mode
This feature allows you to turn the aimer on and off. When the Interlaced bar
code is scanned, the aimer is interlaced with the illumination LEDs.
Default =
Interlaced.
Centering
Use Centering to narrow the imager’s field of view to make sure the imager
reads only those bar codes intended by the user. For instance, if multiple codes
are placed closely together, centering will insure that only the desired codes are
read. (Centering can be used in conjunction with Aimer Delay, page 3-12, for
the most error-free operation in applications where multiple codes are spaced
closely together. Using the Aimer Delay and Centering features, the imager can
emulate the operation of older systems, such as linear laser bar code imagers.)
In the example below, the gray area is the full imager field of view and the white
area is the centering window. Bar Code 1 will not be read, while Bar Code 2 will
be.
The default centering window is a 128x96 pixel area in the center of the
Off
*Interlaced
Bar Code 1
Bar Code 2
3 - 14
imager’s field of view. The following diagram illustrates the default top, bottom,
left, and right pixel positions, measured from the top and the left side of the
imager’s field of view, which is 640 by 480 pixels.
If a bar code is not within the predefined window, it will not be decoded or output
by the imager. If centering is turned on by scanning Centering On, the imager
only reads codes that intersect the centering window you specify using the Top,
Bottom, Left, or Right bar codes.
Scan Centering On, then scan one of the following bar codes to change the
top, bottom, left, or right of the centering window. Then scan the percent you
want to shift the centering window using digits on the inside back cover of this
manual. Scan Save.
Default Centering = 40% for Top and Left, 60% for Bot-
tom and Right.
0
100%
100%
Default
Center
40% 60%
40%
60%
Left
Right
Bottom
Top
Left of Centering Window
Top of Centering Window
Right of Centering Window
Bottom of Centering Window
* Centering Off
Centering On
3 - 15
Decode Search Mode
There are three selectable decode (scanning) modes:
Full Omnidirectional
- Searches for bar code features beginning at the center
of an image, and searches to the image’s limits. This mode reads all symbolo-
gies (including OCR), in any orientation. The Full Omnidirectional search is
very thorough which may slow performance time.
Note: This search mode is the default setting.
Quick Omnidirectional
- This is an abbreviated search for bar code features
around the center region of an image. This mode quickly reads all symbologies
in any orientation. The Quick Omnidirectional mode may miss some off-center
symbols, as well as larger Data Matrix and QR Code symbols.
Advanced Linear Decoding
- Performs quick horizontal linear scans in a cen-
ter band of the image. This mode is
not
omnidirectional, but does quickly read
linear and stacked bar codes. Advanced Linear Decoding cannot read 2D,
OCR, or Postal symbols.
Preferred Symbology
Note: This selection does not apply to OCR.
The imager can be programmed to specify one symbology as a higher priority
over other symbologies in situations where both bar code symbologies appear
on the same label, but the lower priority symbology cannot be disabled.
For example, you may be using the imager in a retail setting to read UPC sym-
bols, but have occasional need to read a code on a drivers license. Since some
licenses have a Code 39 symbol as well as the PDF417 symbol, you can use
Preferred Symbology to specify that the PDF417 symbol be read instead of the
Code 39.
Full Omnidirectional
Quick Omnidirectional
Advanced Linear Decoding
3 - 16
Preferred Symbology classifies each symbology as high priority, low priority,
or as an unspecified type. When a low priority symbology is presented, the
imager ignores it for a set period of time (see Preferred Symbology Time-out on
page 3-17) while it searches for the high priority symbology. If a high priority
symbology is located during this period, then that data is read immediately.
If the time-out period expires before a high priority symbology is read, the
imager will read any bar code in its view (low priority or unspecified). If there is
no bar code in the imager’s view after the time-out period expires, then no data
is reported.
Note: A low priority symbol must be centered on the aiming pattern to be read.
Scan a bar code below to enable or disable Preferred Symbology.
Default =
Preferred Symbology Off.
High Priority Symbology
To specify the high priority symbology, scan the High Priority Symbology bar
code below. On the Symbology Chart on page A-1, find the symbology you
want to set as high priority. Locate the Hex value for that symbology and scan
the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart (inside back cover). Scan
Save to save your selection.
Default = None
Low Priority Symbology
To specify the low priority symbology, scan the Low Priority Symbology bar
code below. On the Symbology Chart on page A-1, find the symbology you
want to set as low priority. Locate the Hex value for that symbology and scan
the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart (inside back cover).
If you want to set additional low priority symbologies, scan FF, then scan the 2
digit hex value from the Programming Chart for the next symbology. You can
program up to 5 low priority symbologies. Scan Save to save your selection.
Default = None
* Preferred Symbology Off
Preferred Symbology On
High Priority Symbology
Low Priority Symbology
3 - 17
Preferred Symbology Time-out
Once you have enabled Preferred Symbology and entered the high and low pri-
ority symbologies, you must set the time-out period. This is the period of time
the imager will search for a high priority bar code after a low priority bar code
has been encountered. Scan the bar code below, then set the delay (from 100-
3,000 milliseconds) by scanning digits from the inside back cover, then scan-
ning Save.
Default = 500 ms.
Preferred Symbology Default
Scan the bar code below to set all Preferred Symbology entries to their default
values.
Output Sequence Overview
Require Output Sequence
When turned off, the bar code data will be output to the host as the imager
decodes it. When turned on, all output data must conform to an edited
sequence or the imager will not transmit the output data to the host device.
Note: This selection is unavailable when Multiple Symbols (page 3-20) is
enabled.
Output Sequence Editor
This programming selection allows you to program the imager to output data
(when scanning more than one symbol) in whatever order your application
requires, regardless of the order in which the bar codes are scanned. Reading
the Default Sequence symbol programs the imager to the Universal values,
shown below. These are the defaults. Be
certain
you want to delete or clear all
formats before you read the Default Sequence symbol.
Note: To make Output Sequence Editor selections, you’ll need to know the code
I.D., code length, and character match(es) your application requires. Use
the Alphanumeric symbols (inside back cover) to read these options.
You must hold the trigger while reading each bar code in the sequence.
To Add an Output Sequence
1. Scan the Enter Sequence symbol (see Require Output Sequence, page 3-
20).
2. Code I.D.
On the Symbology Chart on page A-1, find the symbology to which you want
Preferred Symbology Time-out
Preferred Symbology Default
3 - 18
to apply the output sequence format. Locate the Hex value for that symbol-
ogy and scan the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart (inside back
cover).
3. Length
Specify what length (up to 9999 characters) of data output will be acceptable
for this symbology. Scan the four digit data length from the Programming
Chart. (Note: 50 characters is entered as 0050. 9999 is a universal num-
ber, indicating all lengths.) When calculating the length, you must count any
programmed prefixes, suffixes, or formatted characters as part of the length
(unless using 9999).
4. Character Match Sequences
On the ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4, find the Hex
value that represents the character(s) you want to match. Use the Program-
ming Chart to read the alphanumeric combination that represents the ASCII
characters. (99 is the Universal number, indicating all characters.)
5. End Output Sequence Editor
Scan F F to enter an Output Sequence for an additional symbology, or Save
to save your entries.
Other Programming Selections
Discard
This exits without saving any Output Sequence changes.
Output Sequence Example
In this example, you are scanning Code 93, Code 128, and Code 39 bar codes,
but you want the imager to output Code 39 1st, Code 128 2nd, and Code 93
3rd, as shown below.
Note: Code 93 must be enabled to use this example.
You would set up the sequence editor with the following command line:
SEQBLK62999941FF6A999942FF69999943FF
The breakdown of the command line is shown below:
A - Code 39
B - Code 128
C - Code 93
3 - 19
SEQBLK sequence editor start command
62 code identifier for Code 39
9999 code length that must match for Code 39, 9999 = all lengths
41 start character match for Code 39, 41h = “A”
FF termination string for first code
6A code identifier for Code 128
9999 code length that must match for Code 128, 9999 = all lengths
42 start character match for Code 128, 42h = “B”
FF termination string for second code
69 code identifier for Code 93
9999 code length that must match for Code 93, 9999 = all lengths
43 start character match for Code 93, 43h = “C”
FF termination string for third code
To program the previous example using specific lengths, you would have to
count any programmed prefixes, suffixes, or formatted characters as part of the
length. If you use the example on page 3-18, but assume a <CR> suffix and
specific code lengths, you would use the following command line:
SEQBLK62001241FF6A001342FF69001243FF
The breakdown of the command line is shown below:
SEQBLK sequence editor start command
62 code identifier for Code 39
0012 A - Code 39 sample length (11) plus CR suffix (1) = 12
41 start character match for Code 39, 41h = “A”
FF termination string for first code
6A code identifier for Code 128
0013 B - Code 128 sample length (12) plus CR suffix (1) = 13
42 start character match for Code 128, 42h = “B”
FF termination string for second code
69 code identifier for Code 93
0012 C - Code 93 sample length (11) plus CR suffix (1) = 12
43 start character match for Code 93, 43h = “C”
FF termination string for third code
3 - 20
Output Sequence Editor
Require Output Sequence
When an output sequence is Required, all output data must conform to an
edited sequence or the imager will not transmit the output data to the host
device. When it’s On/Not Required, the imager will attempt to get the output
data to conform to an edited sequence but, if it cannot, the imager transmits all
output data to the host device as is.
When the output sequence is Off, the bar code data is output to the host as the
imager decodes it.
Default = Off.
Note: This selection is unavailable when the Multiple Symbols Selection is
turned on.
Multiple Symbols
Note: This feature does not work when the imager is in Low Power mode.
When this programming selection is turned On, it allows you to read multiple
symbols with a single pull of the imager’s trigger. If you press and hold the trig-
ger, aiming the imager at a series of symbols, it reads unique symbols once,
beeping (if turned on) for each read. The imager attempts to find and decode
Enter Sequence
Default Sequence
Required
On/Not Required
*Off
3 - 21
new symbols as long as the trigger is pulled. When this programming selection
is turned Off, the imager will only read the symbol closest to the aiming beam.
Default = Off.
No Read
With No Read turned On, the imager notifies you if a code cannot be read. If
using a Quick*View Scan Data Window, an “NR” appears when a code cannot
be read. If No Read is turned Off, the “NR” will not appear.
Default = Off.
If you want a different notation than “NR,” for example, “Error,” or “Bad Code,
you can edit the output message using the Data Formatter (page 5-5). The hex
code for the No Read symbol is 9C.
Print Weight
Print Weight is used to adjust the way the imager reads Matrix symbols. If an
imager will be seeing consistently heavily printed matrix symbols, then a print
weight of 6 may improve the reading performance. For consistently light print-
ing, a print weight of 2 may help. After scanning the Set Print Weight
bar code,
set the print weight (from 1-7) by scanning digits from the inside back cover,
then scanning Save.
Default = 4
.
On
* Off
On
* Off
Set Print Weight
* Default
3 - 22
Video Reverse
Video Reverse is used to allow the imager to read bar codes that are inverted.
The Off bar code below is an example of this type of bar code. If additional
menuing is required, Video Reverse must be disabled to read the menu bar
codes and then re-enabled after menuing is completed.
Default = Off.
Note: Images downloaded from the unit will not be reversed. This is a setting
for decoding only.
Working Orientation
Some bar codes are direction-sensitive. For example, KIX codes and OCR can
misread when scanned sideways or upside down. Use the working orientation
settings if your direction-sensitive codes will not usually be presented upright to
the imager.
Default = Upright.
On
* Off
Upright:
Rotate Code Clockwise 90°:
Upside Down:
Rotate Code
Counterclockwise 90°:
3 - 23
* Upright
Rotate Code Clockwise 90°
(Rotate Imager
Counterclockwise)
Upside Down
Rotate Code
Counterclockwise 90°
(Rotate Imager Clockwise)
3 - 24
4 - 1
4
Data Editing
Prefix/Suffix Overview
When a bar code is scanned, additional information is sent to the host computer
along with the bar code data. This group of bar code data and additional,
user-defined data is called a “message string.” The selections in this section
are used to build the user-defined data into the message string.
Prefix and Suffix characters are data characters that can be sent before and
after scanned data. You can specify if they should be sent with all symbologies,
or only with specific symbologies. The following illustration shows the break-
down of a message string:
Points to Keep In Mind
It is not necessary to build a message string. The selections in this chapter
are only used if you wish to alter the default settings.
Default prefix = None.
Default suffix = None
.
A prefix or suffix may be added or cleared from one symbology or all
symbologies.
You can add any prefix or suffix from the ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4, plus Code I.D. and AIM I.D.
You can string together several entries for several symbologies at one time.
Enter prefixes and suffixes in the order in which you want them to appear on
the output.
When setting up for specific symbologies, instead of All Symbologies, the
symbology ID value counts as an added prefix or suffix character.
Prefix Scanned DataSuffix
1-11
alpha numeric
characters
variable length1-11
alpha numeric
characters
4 - 2
To Add a Prefix or Suffix:
Step 1. Scan the Add Prefix or Add Suffix symbol (page 4-4).
Step 2. Determine the 2 digit Hex value from the Symbology Chart (see page
A-1) for the symbology to which you want to apply the prefix or suffix.
For example, for Code 128, Code ID is “j” and Hex ID is “6A”.
Step 3. Scan the 2 hex digits from the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual or scan 9, 9 for all symbologies.
Step 4. Determine the hex value from the ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4, for the prefix or suffix you wish to enter.
Step 5. Scan the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual.
Step 6. Repeat Steps 4 and 5 for every prefix or suffix character.
Step 7. To add the Code I.D., scan 5, C, 8, 0.
To add AIM I.D., scan 5, C, 8, 1.
To add a backslash (\), scan 5, C, 5, C.
Note: To add a backslash (\) as in Step 7, you must scan 5C twice – once to
create the leading backslash and then to create the backslash itself.
Step 8. Scan Save to exit and save, or scan Discard to exit without saving.
Repeat Steps 1-6 to add a prefix or suffix for another symbology.
Example: Add a Suffix to a specific symbology
To send a CR (carriage return)Suffix for UPC only:
Step 1. Scan Add Suffix.
Step 2. Determine the 2 digit hex value from the Symbology Chart (see page
A-1) for UPC.
Step 3. Scan 6, 3 from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this
manual.
Step 4. Determine the hex value from the ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4, for the CR (carriage return).
Step 5. Scan 0, D from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this
manual.
Step 6. Scan Save, or scan Discard to exit without saving.
4 - 3
To Clear One or All Prefixes or Suffixes:
You can clear a single prefix or suffix, or clear all prefixes/suffixes for a symbol-
ogy. When you Clear One Prefix (Suffix), the specific character you select is
deleted from the symbology you want. When you Clear All Prefixes (Suffixes),
all the prefixes or suffixes for a symbology are deleted.
Step 1. Scan the Clear One Prefix or Clear One Suffix symbol.
Step 2. Determine the 2 digit Hex value from the Symbology Chart (see page
A-1) for the symbology from which you want to clear the prefix or suffix.
Step 3. Scan the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual or scan 9, 9 for all symbologies.
Your change is automatically saved.
To Add a Carriage Return Suffix to all Symbologies
Scan the following bar code if you wish to add a carriage return suffix to all sym-
bologies at once. This action first clears all current suffixes, then programs a
carriage return suffix for all symbologies.
Add CR Suffix
All Symbologies
4 - 4
Prefix Selections
Suffix Selections
Function Code Transmit
When this selection is enabled and function codes are contained within the
scanned data, the imager transmits the function code to the terminal. Charts of
these function codes are provided in Supported Interface Keys starting on
page 10-3. When the imager is in keyboard wedge mode, the scan code is con-
verted to a key code before it is transmitted.
Default = Enable.
Add Prefix
Clear One Prefix
Clear All Prefixes
Add Suffix
Clear One Suffix
Clear All Suffixes
* Enable
Disable
4 - 5
Intercharacter, Interfunction, and Intermessage
Delays
Some terminals drop information (characters) if data comes through too quickly.
Intercharacter, interfunction, and intermessage delays slow the transmission of
data, increasing data integrity.
Each delay is composed of a 5 millisecond step. You can program up to 99
steps (of 5 ms each) for a range of 0-495 ms.
Intercharacter Delay
An intercharacter delay of up to 495 milliseconds (in 5 ms steps) may be placed
between the transmission of each character of scanned data. Scan the
Inter-
character Delay bar code below, then scan the number of 5 millisecond steps
(0-99), and the Save bar code using the Programming Chart inside the back
cover of this manual.
To remove this delay, scan the Intercharacter Delay bar code, then set the
number of steps to 0. Scan the Save bar code using the Programming Chart
inside the back cover of this manual.
Note: Intercharacter delays are not supported in USB serial emulation.
User Specified Intercharacter Delay
An intercharacter delay of up to 495 milliseconds (in 5 ms steps) may be placed
after the transmission of a particular character of scanned data. Scan the
Delay Length bar code below, then scan the number of 5 millisecond steps (0-
99), and the Save bar code using the Programming Chart inside the back cover
of this manual.
12345
Intercharacter Delay
Prefix Scanned Data Suffix
Intercharacter Delay
4 - 6
Next, scan the Character to Trigger Delay bar code, then the 2-digit hex value
for the ASCII character that will trigger the delay ASCII Conversion Chart (Code
Page 1252), page A-4.
To remove this delay, scan the Delay Length bar code, and set the number of
steps to 0. Scan the Save bar code using the Programming Chart inside the
back cover of this manual.
Interfunction Delay
An interfunction delay of up to 495 milliseconds (in 5 ms steps) may be placed
between the transmission of each segment of the message string. Scan the
Interfunction Delay bar code below, then scan the number of 5 millisecond
steps (0-99), and the Save bar code using the Programming Chart inside the
back cover of this manual.
To remove this delay, scan the Interfunction Delay bar code, then set the num-
ber of steps to 0. Scan the Save bar code using the Programming Chart inside
the back cover of this manual.
Delay Length
Character to Trigger Delay
Interfunction Delays
Prefix Scanned Data Suffix
12345STX HT CR LF
Interfunction Delay
4 - 7
Intermessage Delay
An intermessage delay of up to 495 milliseconds (in 5 ms steps) may be placed
between each scan transmission. Scan the
Intermessage Delay bar code
below, then scan the number of 5 millisecond steps (0-99), and the Save bar
code using the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual.
To remove this delay, scan the
Intermessage Delay bar code, then set the
number of steps to 0. Scan the Save bar code using the Programming Chart
inside the back cover of this manual.
2nd Scan Transmission1st Scan Transmission
Intermessage Delay
Intermessage Delay
4 - 8
5 - 1
5
Data Formatting
Data Format Editor Introduction
You may use the Data Format Editor to change the imager’s output. For exam-
ple, you can use the Data Format Editor to insert characters at certain points in
bar code data as it is scanned. The selections in the following pages are used
only if you wish to alter the output.
Default Data Format setting = None.
Normally, when you scan a bar code, it gets outputted automatically; however
when you do a format, you must use a “send” command (see Send Commands
on page 5-2) within the format program to output data.
Multiple formats may be programmed into the imager. They are stacked in the
order in which they are entered. However, the following list presents the order
in which formats are applied:
1. Specific Term ID, Actual Code ID, Actual Length
2. Specific Term ID, Actual Code ID, Universal Length
3. Specific Term ID, Universal Code ID, Actual Length
4. Specific Term ID, Universal Code ID, Universal Length
5. Universal Term ID, Actual Code ID, Actual Length
6. Universal Term ID, Actual Code ID, Universal Length
7. Universal Term ID, Universal Code ID, Actual Length
8. Universal Term ID, Universal Code ID, Universal Length
If you have changed data format settings, and wish to clear all formats and
return to the factory defaults, scan the Default Data Format code on page 5-5.
To Add a Data Format
Step 1. Scan the Enter Data Format symbol (page 5-5).
Step 2. Primary/Alternate Format
Determine if this will be your primary data format, or one of 3 alternate
formats. (Alternate formats allow you “single shot” capability to scan
one bar code using a different data format. After the one bar code has
been read, the imager reverts to the primary data format. See page 5-
6.) If you are programming the primary format, scan 0 using the
Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual. If you are
programming an alternate format, scan 1, 2, or 3, depending on the
alternate format you are programming.
Step 3. Terminal Type
Refer to Supported Terminals (page 2-2) and locate the Terminal ID
number for your PC. Scan three numeric bar codes on the inside back
cover to program the imager for your terminal ID (you must enter 3 dig-
its). For example, scan 0 0 3 for an AT wedge.
Note: The wildcard for all terminal types is 099.
5 - 2
Step 4. Code I.D.
In the Symbology Chart (page A-1), find the symbology to which you
want to apply the data format. Locate the Hex value for that symbology
and scan the 2 digit hex value from the Programming Chart inside the
back cover of this manual.
Step 5. Length
Specify what length (up to 9999 characters) of data will be acceptable
for this symbology. Scan the four digit data length from the
Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual. (Note: 50
characters is entered as 0050. 9999 is a universal number, indicating
all lengths.)
Step 6. Editor Commands
Refer to Data Format Editor Commands (page 5-2). Scan the symbols
that represent the command you want to enter. 94 alphanumeric char-
acters may be entered for each symbology data format.
Step 7. Scan Save from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this
manual to save your entries.
Other Programming Selections
Clear One Data Format
This deletes one data format for one symbology. If you are clearing the
primary format, scan 0 from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of
this manual. If you are clearing an alternate format, scan 1, 2, or 3, depending
on the alternate format you are clearing. Scan the Terminal Type and Code
I.D. (see Supported Terminals on page 2-2), and the bar code data length for
the specific data format that you want to delete. All other formats remain
unaffected.
Save from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual
This exits, saving any Data Format changes.
Discard from the Programming Chart inside the back cover of this manual
This exits without saving any Data Format changes.
Data Format Editor Commands
Send Commands
F1 Send all characters followed by “xx” key or function code, starting from cur-
rent cursor position.
Syntax = F1xx
(xx stands for the hex value for an
ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.)
F2 Send “nn” characters followed by “xx” key or function code, starting from
current cursor position.
Syntax = F2nnxx
(nn stands for the numeric value
(00-99) for the number of characters and xx stands for the hex value for an
ASCII code. See ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.)
F3 Send up to but not including “ss” character (Search and Send) starting from
current cursor position, leaving cursor pointing to “ss” character followed by
“xx” key or function code.
Syntax = F3ssxx
(ss and xx both stand for the
hex values for ASCII codes, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4.)
5 - 3
F4 Send “xx” character “nn” times (Insert) leaving cursor in current cursor posi-
tion.
Syntax = F4xxnn
(xx stands for the hex value for an ASCII code, see
ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4, and nn is the
numeric value (00-99) for the number of times it should be sent.)
E9 Send all but the last “nn” characters, starting from the current cursor posi-
tion.
Syntax = E9nn
(nn is the numeric value (00-99) for the number of
characters that will not be sent at the end of the message.)
Move Commands
F5 Move the cursor ahead “nn” characters from current cursor position.
Syntax = F5nn
(nn stands for the numeric value (00-99) for the number of
characters the cursor should be moved ahead.)
F6 Move the cursor back “nn” characters from current cursor position.
Syntax = F6nn
(nn stands for the numeric value (00-99) for the number of
characters the cursor should be moved back.)
F7 Move the cursor to the beginning of the data string.
Syntax = F7.
EA Move the cursor to the end of the data string.
Syntax = EA
Search Commands
F8 Search ahead for “xx” character from current cursor position, leaving cursor
pointing to “xx” character.
Syntax = F8xx
(xx stands for the hex value for
an ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.)
F9 Search back for “xx” character from current cursor position, leaving cursor
pointing to “xx” character.
Syntax = F9xx
(xx stands for the hex value for
an ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.)
E6 Search ahead for the first non “xx” character from the current cursor posi-
tion, leaving cursor pointing to non “xx” character.
Syntax = E6xx
(xx
stands for the hex value for an ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart
(Code Page 1252), page A-4.
E7 Search back for the first non “xx” character from the current cursor position,
leaving cursor pointing to non “xx” character.
Syntax = E7xx
(xx stands for
the hex value for an ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4.)
Miscellaneous Commands
FB Suppress all occurrences of up to 15 different characters, starting at the
current cursor position, as the cursor is advanced by other commands.
When the FC command is encountered, the suppress function is termi-
nated. The cursor is not moved by the FB command.
Syntax = FBnnxxyy
. .zz
where nn is a count of the number of suppressed characters in the list
and xxyy .. zz is the list of characters to be suppressed. (xx stands for the
hex value for an ASCII code, see ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page
1252), page A-4.)
FC Disables suppress filter and clear all suppressed characters.
Syntax = FC.
E4 Replaces up to 15 characters in the data string with user specified charac-
ters. Replacement continues until the E5 command is encountered.
Syn-
tax = E4nnxx1xx2yy1yy2...zz1zz2
where nn is the total count of both
characters to be replaced plus replacement characters; xx1 defines charac-
5 - 4
ters to be replaced and xx2 defines replacement characters, continuing
through zz1 and zz2.
E5 Terminates character replacement.
Syntax = E5.
FE Compare character in current cursor position to the character “xx.” If char-
acters are equal, increment cursor. If characters are not equal, no format
match.
Syntax = FExx
(xx stands for the hex value for an ASCII code, see
ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.)
EC Check to make sure there is an ASCII number at the current cursor posi-
tion. If character is not numeric, format is aborted.
Syntax = EC
.
ED Check to make sure there is a non-numeric ASCII character at the current
cursor position. If character is numeric, format is aborted.
Syntax = ED
.
5 - 5
Data Format Editor
Data Formatter
When Data Formatter is turned off, the bar code data is output to the host as
read (including prefixes and suffixes). Choose one of the following options.
Default = Data Formatter On, but Not Required.
When Data Formatter is required, all input data must conform to an edited for-
mat or the imager does not transmit the input data to the host device.
Enter Data Format
* Default Data Format
Clear One Data Format
Save
Discard
Clear All Data Formats
Data Formatter Off
* Data Formatter On,
but Not Required
Data Format On, Format Required
5 - 6
Alternate Data Formats
Alternate formats allow you “single shot” capability to scan one bar code using a
different data format than your primary format. When data formats are pro-
grammed (see page 5-1), you must input whether you are programming the pri-
mary format, or an alternate format numbered 1, 2, or 3.
An alternate format is initiated by scanning one of the 3 alternate format bar
codes below. The imager will scan the next bar code, formatting the data with
the selected alternate format, then revert immediately to the primary format.
Alternate Data Format 1
Alternate Data Format 2
Alternate Data Format 3
6 - 1
6
Secondary Interface
By switching secondary interface cables, the imager can, for example, commu-
nicate with a portable data terminal (secondary interface) in addition to the host
terminal (primary interface). Refer to the table below for interfaces supported
by your model. Some features don’t apply if the interface is not supported by
your model.
The secondary interface can be programmed at any time.
Imager Models
Models Primary Secondary
4600gXX03XX
4800iXX03XX
True RS-232 True RS-232
4600gXX05XX
4800iXX05XX
Keyboard wedge, TTL level
232, TTL level 232 serial
wedge, IBM 4683, wand emula-
tion, USB keyboard, USB HID,
USB retail (IBM SurePOS),
USB COM port emulation
Wand Emulation, TTL
level 232
4600rXX05XX Keyboard wedge, TTL level
232, TTL level 232 serial
wedge, IBM 4683, USB key-
board, USB HID, USB retail
(IBM SurePOS), USB COM
port emulation
TTL level 232
4600rpXX05XX Keyboard wedge, TTL level
232, TTL level 232 serial
wedge, IBM 4683, USB key-
board, USB HID, USB retail
(IBM SurePOS), USB COM
port emulation
TTL level 232
6 - 2
You can temporarily disable the secondary interface, but still retain the second-
ary interface settings in the imager’s memory by scanning the Disable bar code
below. To re-enable the secondary interface, scan the Enable bar code.
Default =Disable
.
Secondary RS-232 Connection
All communication parameters between the imager and terminal must match for
correct data transfer through the serial port using RS-232 protocol.
RS-232 programmable selections are used by both the primary and secondary
interfaces. Changing an RS-232 parameter (e.g., baud rate or parity), while in
primary
or
secondary mode will affect both interfaces. If you want to change the
RS-232 settings, refer to RS-232 Baud Rate, page 2-10.
Secondary Code 39 Wand Emulation
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 6-1 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
In Wand Emulation mode, the imager decodes the bar code then sends data in
the same format as a wand imager. The Code 39 Format converts all symbolo-
gies to Code 39. The Same Code Format transmits UPC, EAN, Code 128,
Codabar, and Interleaved 2 of 5 without any changes, but converts all other
symbologies to Code 39. 2D symbologies are converted to Code 128. These
codes set the transmission rate to 25 inches per second and the output polarity
to black, high.
Default = Code 39 Format.
* Disable
Enable
RS-232 Interface
6 - 3
The Code 39 Format bar code below sets the terminal ID to 61, and the Same
Code Format bar code sets the terminal ID to 64.
Wand Emulation Multi Block
Note: See "Imager Models" on page 6-1 to determine which interfaces apply to
your imager.
Note: Changing secondary wand emulation settings also changes the primary
wand emulation settings (see Wand Emulation on page 2-13).
Delay Between Blocks
This sets the delay time between data blocks.
Default = 50ms.
5ms
500ms
* 50ms
150ms
6 - 4
Overall Checksum
When this option is turned on, a computed check character is added at the end
of the entire message. The check character is the character which when Exclu-
sive-OR’d with every preceding character of the message yields a result of 0x00
(00H).
Default = Off.
Wand Emulation Transmission Rate
The transmission rate is limited by the terminal’s ability to receive data without
dropping characters.
Default = 25 inches/second.
On
* Off
10
80
* 25
40
120
150
200
6 - 5
Wand Emulation Polarity
The polarity can be sent as standard with black bars high, or reversed with white
bars high.
Default = Black High.
Wand Emulation Idle
The idle describes the state of the imager when no data is being transmitted.
When in Wand Emulation mode, you must set the imager’s idle state to match
the idle state for the device to which the imager is connected.
Default = Idle
High
.
Data Block Size
This transmits the data in smaller blocks to prevent buffer overflow.
Default =
40.
* Black High
White High
* Idle High
Idle Low
20
80
* 40
60
6 - 6
Secondary Trigger Mode
Manual/Serial Trigger
You can activate the imager either by pressing the trigger, or using a serial trig-
ger command (see Trigger Commands on page 12-4). When in manual trigger
mode, the imager scans until a bar code is read, or until the trigger is released.
When in serial mode, the imager scans until a bar code has been read or until
the deactivate command is sent. The imager can also be set to turn itself off
after a specified time has elapsed (see Read Time-Out, which follows).
Read Time-Out
Use this selection to set a time-out (in milliseconds) of the imager’s trigger when
using serial commands to trigger the imager, or if the imager is in manual trigger
mode. Once the imager has timed out, you can activate the imager either by
pressing the trigger or using a serial trigger command. After scanning the Read
Time-Out bar code, set the time-out duration (from 0-300,000 milliseconds) by
scanning digits from the inside back cover, then scanning Save.
Default =
30,000.
Note: Programming Read Time-Out in the secondary interface also programs it
in the primary interface.
Manual Trigger, Low Power
When using Manual Trigger, Low Power, the imager powers down until the trig-
ger is pulled. When the trigger is pulled, the imager powers up and operates
until there is no triggering for the time set with the Low Power Time-Out bar
code below. There is a delay of up to one second in operation when the imager
is first triggered, but there is no delay when operating in low power time-out
mode.
Note: Manual Trigger, Low Power cannot be used with keyboard wedge
applications.
* Manual/Serial Trigger
Read Time-Out
Manual Trigger, Low Power
6 - 7
Low Power Time-Out Timer
Scan the Low Power Time-Out bar code to change the time-out duration (in
seconds). Then scan the time-out duration (from 0-300 seconds) from the
inside back cover, and Save.
Default = 120 seconds.
If the unit remains idle during the low power time-out interval, the unit goes into
low power mode. Whenever the trigger is enabled, the low power time-out timer
is reset.
Note: This time-out does not begin until the imager time-out setting has expired.
Programming Low Power Time-Out in the secondary interface also
programs it in the primary interface.
Hands Free Time-Out
The Automatic Trigger and Presentation Modes are referred to as “hands free”
modes. If the imager’s trigger is pulled when using a hands free mode, the
imager changes to manual trigger mode. You can set the time the imager
should remain in manual trigger mode by setting the Hands Free Time-Out.
Once the time-out value is reached, (if there have been no further trigger pulls)
the imager reverts to the original hands free mode.
Note: If you change the time-out duration for the secondary interface, the
duration of the primary interface will also be changed.
Scan the Hands Free Time-Out bar code, then scan the time-out duration
(from 0-300,000 milliseconds) from the inside back cover, and Save.
Default =
5,000 ms.
Low Power Time-Out
Hands Free Time-Out
6 - 8
Scan Stand Mode
When a unit is in Scan Stand mode, it remains idle as long as it sees the Scan
Stand symbol. (See Scan Stand Symbol that follows.) When a different code
is presented, the imager is triggered to read the new code.
Note: The imager automatically adjusts the illumination LEDs to the lowest light
level possible to maintain a good lock on the Scan Stand symbol. When
a symbol is presented, the imager’s light levels adjust to the saved setting
(see LED Power Level on page 3-10).
Scan Stand Symbol
When a unit is in Scan Stand mode, the LEDs shine at the Scan Stand symbol
on the base of the stand which tells it to remain idle.
When the Scan Stand
symbol is covered, the imager turns the LEDs on at the configured power level
(Default High) and attempts to find and decode bar codes in its field of view.
Presentation Mode
This programs the imager to work in Presentation mode. The LEDs are either
off or at the lowest power for ambient conditions until a bar code is presented to
the imager. Then the LEDs turn on automatically to read the code. Presenta-
tion Mode uses ambient light to detect the bar codes. If the light level in the
room is not high enough, Presentation Mode may not work properly.
Scan Stand Mode
Scan Stand Symbol
Presentation Mode
7 - 1
7
Symbologies
This programming section contains the following menu selections. Refer to
Chapter 12 for settings and defaults.
All Symbologies Postal-4i
Australian Post Intelligent Mail Bar
Code
Aztec Code Interleaved 2 of 5
British Post Japanese Post
Canadian Post Kix (Netherlands)
Post
China Post Korea Post
Chinese Sensible (Han Xin) Code Matrix 2 of 5
• Codabar • MaxiCode
Codablock F MicroPDF417
Code 11 MSI
Code 128 PDF417
Code 16K Planet Code
Code 39 Plessey Code
Code 49 PosiCode A and B
Code 93 Postnet
Data Matrix QR Code
EAN/JAN-13 Straight 2 of 5 IATA
•EAN/JAN-8 Straight 2 of 5
Industrial
GS1 Composite Codes TCIF Linked Code 39
(TLC39)
GS1 DataBar Expanded Telepen
GS1 DataBar Limited UPC-A/EAN-13 with
Extended Coupon
Code
GS1 DataBar Omnidirectional UPC-A
7 - 2
All Symbologies
If you want to decode all the symbologies allowable for your imager, scan the
All Symbologies On code. If on the other hand, you want to decode only a
particular symbology, scan All Symbologies Off followed by the On symbol for
that particular symbology.
Message Length Description
You are able to set the valid reading length of some of the bar code symbologies.
If the data length of the scanned bar code doesn’t match the valid reading length,
the imager will issue an error beep. You may wish to set the same value for
minimum and maximum length to force the imager to read fixed length bar code
data. This helps reduce the chances of a misread.
EXAMPLE: Decode only those bar codes with a count of 9-20 characters.
Min. length = 09 Max. length = 20
EXAMPLE: Decode only those bar codes with a count of 15 characters.
Min. length = 15 Max. length = 15
For a value other than the minimum and maximum message length defaults,
scan the bar codes included in the explanation of the symbology, then scan the
digit value of the message length and Save bar codes on the Programming Chart
inside the back cover of this manual. The minimum and maximum lengths and
the defaults are included with the respective symbologies.
All Symbologies On
All Symbologies Off
7 - 3
Codabar
<Default All Codabar Settings>
Codabar
Codabar Start/Stop Characters
Start/Stop characters identify the leading and trailing ends of the bar code. You
may either transmit, or not transmit Start/Stop characters.
Default = Don’t Transmit
.
Codabar Check Character
Codabar check characters are created using different “modulos.” You can pro-
gram the imager to read only Codabar bar codes with Modulo 16 check charac-
ters.
Default = No Check Character.
No Check Character indicates that the imager reads and transmits bar code
data with or without a check character.
When Check Character is set to Validate and Transmit, the imager will only
read Codabar bar codes printed with a check character, and will transmit this
character at the end of the scanned data.
* On
Off
Transmit
* Don’t Transmit
7 - 4
When Check Character is set to Validate, but Don’t Transmit, the unit will only
read Codabar bar codes printed
with
a check character, but will not transmit the
check character with the scanned data.
Codabar Concatenation
Codabar supports symbol concatenation. When you enable concatenation, the
imager looks for a Codabar symbol having a “D” start character, adjacent to a
symbol having a “D” stop character. In this case the two messages are concat-
enated into one with the “D” characters omitted.
Select
Require to prevent the imager from decoding a single “D” Codabar sym-
bol without its companion. This selection has no effect on Codabar symbols
without Stop/Start D characters.
* No Check Character
Validate Modulo 16
and Transmit
Validate Modulo 16, but
Don’t Transmit
A12D D34A
Codabar
Character Stop Start StopStart
On
* Off
Require
7 - 5
Codabar Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 2-60. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 60.
Code 39
< Default All Code 39 Settings >
Code 39
Code 39 Start/Stop Characters
Start/Stop characters identify the leading and trailing ends of the bar code. You
may either transmit, or not transmit Start/Stop characters.
Default =
Don’t
Tra nsmit.
Code 39 Check Character
No Check Character indicates that the imager reads and transmits bar code
data with or without a check character.
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
* On
Off
Transmit
* Don’t Transmit
7 - 6
When Check Character is set to Validate, but Don’t Transmit, the unit only
reads Code 39 bar codes printed with a check character, but will not transmit
the check character with the scanned data.
When Check Character is set to Validate and Transmit, the imager only reads
Code 39 bar codes printed with a check character, and will transmit this charac-
ter at the end of the scanned data.
Default = No Check Character.
Code 39 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 0-48. Minimum Default = 0, Maximum Default = 48.
Code 39 Append
This function allows the imager to append the data from several Code 39 bar
codes together before transmitting them to the host computer. When this func-
tion is enabled, the imager stores those Code 39 bar codes that start with a
space (excluding the start and stop symbols), and does not immediately trans-
mit the data. The imager stores the data in the order in which the bar codes are
read, deleting the first space from each. The imager transmits the appended
data when it reads a Code 39 bar code that starts with a character other than a
space.
Default = Off.
Validate, but Don’t Transmit
* No Check Character
Validate and Transmit
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
* Off
On
7 - 7
Code 32 Pharmaceutical (PARAF)
Code 32 Pharmaceutical is a form of the Code 39 symbology used by Italian
pharmacies. This symbology is also known as PARAF.
Note: Trioptic Code (page 7-32) must be turned off while scanning Code 32
Pharmaceutical codes.
Full ASCII
If Full ASCII Code 39 decoding is enabled, certain character pairs within the bar
code symbol will be interpreted as a single character. For example: $V will be
decoded as the ASCII character SYN, and /C will be decoded as the ASCII
character #.
Default = Off
.
NUL %U DLE $P
SP SPACE
00@%VPP‘%Wp+P
SOH $A DC1 $Q !/A 11AAQQa+Aq+Q
STX $B DC2 $R “/B 22BBRRb+Br+R
ETX $C DC3 $S #/C 33CCSSc+Cs+S
EOT $D DC4 $T $/D 44DDTTd+Dt+T
ENQ $E NAK $U %/E 55EEUUe+Eu+U
ACK $F SYN $V &/F 66FFVVf+Fv+V
BEL $G ETB $W ‘/G77GGWWg+Gw+W
BS $H CAN $X (/H 88HHXXh+Hx+X
HT $I EM $Y )/I 99IIYYi+Iy+Y
LF $J SUB $Z */J :/ZJJZZj+Jz+Z
VT $K ESC %A +/K ;%FKK[%Kk+K{%P
FF $L FS %B ,/L <%GLL\%Ll+L|%Q
CR $M GS %C -- =%HMM]%Mm+M}%R
SO $N RS %D .. >%INN^%Nn+N~%S
SI $O US %E //O ?%JOO_%Oo+ODEL %T
* Off
On
7 - 8
Character pairs /M and /N decode as a minus sign and period respectively.
Character pairs /P through /Y decode as 0 through 9.
Code 39 Code Page
Code pages define the mapping of character codes to characters. If the data
received does not display with the proper characters, it may be because the bar
code being scanned was created using a code page that is different from the
one the host program is expecting. If this is the case, scan the bar code below,
select the code page with which the bar codes were created (see Code Page
Mapping of Printed Bar Codes on page A-6), and scan the value and the Save
bar code from the Programming Chart on the inside the back cover of this man-
ual. The data characters should then appear properly.
Interleaved 2 of 5
< Default All Interleaved 2 of 5 Settings >
Interleaved 2 of 5
Check Digit
No Check Digit indicates that the imager reads and transmits bar code data
with or without a check digit.
* Full ASCII Off
Full ASCII On
Code 39 Code Page
* On
Off
7 - 9
When Check Digit is set to Validate, but Don’t Transmit, the unit only reads
Interleaved 2 of 5 bar codes printed with a check digit, but will not transmit the
check digit with the scanned data.
When Check Digit is set to Validate and Transmit, the imager only reads Inter-
leaved 2 of 5 bar codes printed with a check digit, and will transmit this digit at
the end of the scanned data.
Default = No Check Digit.
Interleaved 2 of 5 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 2-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 80.
Validate, but Don’t Transmit
* No Check Digit
Validate and Transmit
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 10
Code 93
< Default All Code 93 Settings >
Code 93
Code 93 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 0-80. Minimum Default = 0, Maximum Default = 80.
Code 93 Code Page
Code pages define the mapping of character codes to characters. If the data
received does not display with the proper characters, it may be because the bar
code being scanned was created using a code page that is different from the
one the host program is expecting. If this is the case, scan the bar code below,
select the code page with which the bar codes were created (see Code Page
Mapping of Printed Bar Codes on page A-6), and scan the value and the Save
bar code from the Programming Chart on the inside the back cover of this man-
ual. The data characters should then appear properly.
* On
Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
Code 93 Code Page
7 - 11
Straight 2 of 5 Industrial
<Default All Straight 2 of 5 Industrial Settings>
Straight 2 of 5 Industrial
Straight 2 of 5 Industrial Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-48. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 12
Straight 2 of 5 IATA (Two-Bar Start/Stop)
<Default All Straight 2 of 5 IATA Settings>
Straight 2 of 5 IATA
Straight 2 of 5 IATA Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-48. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 13
Matrix 2 of 5
<Default All Matrix 2 of 5 Settings>
Matrix 2 of 5
Matrix 2 of 5 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 80.
Code 11
<Default All Code 11 Settings>
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 14
Code 11
Check Digits Required
This option sets whether 1 or 2 check digits are required with Code 11 bar
codes.
Default = Two Check Digits.
Code 11 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 80.
On
* Off
One Check Digit
* Two Check Digits
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 15
Code 128
<Default All Code 128 Settings>
Code 128
ISBT 128 Concatenation
In 1994 the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) ratified a standard
for communicating critical blood information in a uniform manner. The use of
ISBT formats requires a paid license. The ISBT 128 Application Specification
describes 1) the critical data elements for labeling blood products, 2) the current
recommendation to use Code 128 due to its high degree of security and its
space-efficient design, 3) a variation of Code 128 that supports concatenation
of neighboring symbols, and 4) the standard layout for bar codes on a blood
product label. Use the bar codes below to turn concatenation on or off.
Default
=Off.
* On
Off
* Off
On
7 - 16
Code 128 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 0-80. Minimum Default = 0, Maximum Default = 80.
Code 128 Code Page
Code pages define the mapping of character codes to characters. If the data
received does not display with the proper characters, it may be because the bar
code being scanned was created using a code page that is different from the
one the host program is expecting. If this is the case, scan the bar code below,
select the code page with which the bar codes were created (see Code Page
Mapping of Printed Bar Codes on page A-6), and scan the value and the Save
bar code from the Programming Chart on the inside the back cover of this man-
ual. The data characters should then appear properly.
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
Code 128 Code Page
7 - 17
Telepen
<Default All Telepen Settings>
Telepen
Telepen Output
Using AIM Telepen Output, the imager reads symbols with start/stop pattern 1
and decodes them as standard full ASCII (start/stop pattern 1). When Original
Telepen Output is selected, the imager reads symbols with start/stop pattern 1
and decodes them as compressed numeric with optional full ASCII (start/stop
pattern 2).
Default = AIM Telepen Output.
Telepen Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-60. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 60.
On
* Off
Original Telepen Output
* AIM Telepen Output
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 18
UPC-A
<Default All UPC-A Settings>
UPC-A
UPC-A Check Digit
This selection allows you to specify whether the check digit should be transmit-
ted at the end of the scanned data or not.
Default = On
.
UPC-A Number System
The numeric system digit of a UPC symbol is normally transmitted at the begin-
ning of the scanned data, but the unit can be programmed so it will not transmit
it.
Default = On.
* On
Off
* On
Off
Off
* On
7 - 19
UPC-A Addenda
This selection adds 2 or 5 digits to the end of all scanned UPC-A data.
Default = Off for both 2 Digit and 5 Digit Addenda.
UPC-A Addenda Required
When Required is scanned, the imager will only read UPC-A bar codes that
have addenda. You must then turn on a 2 or 5 digit addenda listed on page 7-
19.
Default = Not Required.
UPC-A Addenda Separator
When this feature is on, there is a space between the data from the bar code
and the data from the addenda. When turned off, there is no space.
Default = On.
* 5 Digit Addenda Off
5 Digit Addenda On
* 2 Digit Addenda Off
2 Digit Addenda On
* Not Required
Required
Off
* On
7 - 20
UPC-A/EAN-13
with Extended Coupon Code
Use the following codes to enable or disable UPC-A and EAN-13 with Extended
Coupon Code. When left on the default setting (Off), the imager treats Coupon
Codes and Extended Coupon Codes as single bar codes.
If you scan the Allow Concatenation code, when the imager sees the coupon
code and the extended coupon code in a single scan, it transmits both as sepa-
rate symbologies. Otherwise, it transmits the first coupon code it reads.
If you scan the Require Concatenation code, the imager must see and read
the coupon code and extended coupon code in a single read to transmit the
data. No data is output unless both codes are read.
Default = Off.
UPC-E0
<Default All UPC-E Settings>
UPC-E0
Most UPC bar codes lead with the 0 number system. To read these codes, use
the UPC-E0 On selection. If you need to read codes that lead with the 1 num-
ber system, use UPC-E1 (page 7-22).
Default = On.
Allow Concatenation
* Off
Require Concatenation
* UPC-E0 On
UPC-E0 Off
7 - 21
UPC-E0 Expand
UPC-E Expand expands the UPC-E code to the 12 digit, UPC-A format.
Default = Off.
UPC-E0 Addenda Required
When Required is scanned, the imager will only read UPC-E bar codes that
have addenda.
Default = Not Required.
UPC-E0 Addenda Separator
When this feature is On, there is a space between the data from the bar code
and the data from the addenda. When turned Off, there is no space.
Default = On.
UPC-E0 Check Digit
Check Digit specifies whether the check digit should be transmitted at the end of
the scanned data or not.
Default = On.
* Off
On
* Not Required
Required
Off
* On
Off
* On
7 - 22
UPC-E0 Number System
The numeric system digit of a UPC symbol is normally transmitted at the begin-
ning of the scanned data, but the unit can be programmed so it will not transmit
it. To prevent transmission, scan Off.
Default = On.
UPC-E0 Addenda
This selection adds 2 or 5 digits to the end of all scanned UPC-E data.
Default = Off for both 2 Digit and 5 Digit Addenda.
UPC-E1
Most UPC bar codes lead with the 0 number system. For these codes, use
UPC-E0 (page 7-20). If you need to read codes that lead with the 1 number
system, use the UPC-E1 On selection.
Default = Off.
Off
* On
* 5 Digit Addenda Off
5 Digit Addenda On
* 2 Digit Addenda Off
2 Digit Addenda On
UPC-E1 On
* UPC-E1 Off
7 - 23
EAN/JAN-13
<Default All EAN/JAN Settings>
EAN/JAN-13
EAN/JAN-13 Check Digit
This selection allows you to specify whether the check digit should be transmit-
ted at the end of the scanned data or not.
Default = On.
* On
Off
Off
* On
7 - 24
EAN/JAN-13 Addenda
This selection adds 2 or 5 digits to the end of all scanned EAN/JAN-13 data.
Default = Off for both 2 Digit and 5 Digit Addenda.
EAN/JAN-13 Addenda Required
When Required is scanned, the imager will only read EAN/JAN-13 bar codes
that have addenda.
Default = Not Required.
EAN/JAN-13 Addenda Separator
When this feature is On, there is a space between the data from the bar code
and the data from the addenda. When turned Off, there is no space.
Default = On.
Note: If you want to enable or disable EAN13 with Extended Coupon Code,
refer to UPC-A/EAN-13 with Extended Coupon Code (page 7-20).
* 5 Digit Addenda Off
5 Digit Addenda On
* 2 Digit Addenda Off
2 Digit Addenda On
* Not Required
Required
Off
* On
7 - 25
ISBN Translate
When On is scanned, EAN-13 Bookland symbols are translated into their equiv-
alent ISBN number format.
Default = Off.
EAN/JAN-8
<Default All EAN/JAN-8 Settings>
EAN/JAN-8
EAN/JAN-8 Check Digit
This selection allows you to specify whether the check digit should be transmit-
ted at the end of the scanned data or not.
Default = On.
* Off
On
* On
Off
Off
* On
7 - 26
EAN/JAN-8 Addenda
This selection adds 2 or 5 digits to the end of all scanned EAN/JAN-8 data.
Default = Off for both 2 Digit and 5 Digit Addenda.
EAN/JAN-8 Addenda Required
When Required is scanned, the imager will only read EAN/JAN-8 bar codes
that have addenda.
Default = Not Required.
EAN/JAN-8 Addenda Separator
When this feature is On, there is a space between the data from the bar code
and the data from the addenda. When turned Off, there is no space.
Default = On.
* 5 Digit Addenda Off
5 Digit Addenda On
* 2 Digit Addenda Off
2 Digit Addenda On
* Not Required
Required
Off
* On
7 - 27
MSI
<Default All MSI Settings>
MSI
MSI Check Character
Different types of check characters are used with MSI bar codes. You can
program the imager to read MSI bar codes with Type 10 check characters.
Default = Validate Type 10, but Don’t Transmit.
When Check Character is set to Validate Type 10 and Transmit, the imager will
only read MSI bar codes printed with the specified type check character, and will
transmit this character at the end of the scanned data.
When Check Character is set to Validate Type 10, but Don’t Transmit, the unit
will only read MSI bar codes printed with the specified type check character, but
will not transmit the check character with the scanned data.
On
* Off
Validate Type 10 and Transmit
* Validate Type 10, but Don’t
Transmit
7 - 28
MSI Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 4-48. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
Plessey Code
<Default All Plessey Code Settings>
Plessey Code
Plessey Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 4-48. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 29
GS1 DataBar Omnidirectional
< Default All GS1 DataBar Omnidirectional Settings >
GS1 DataBar Omnidirectional
GS1 DataBar Limited
< Default All GS1 DataBar Limited Settings >
GS1 DataBar Limited
GS1 DataBar Expanded
< Default All GS1 DataBar Expanded Settings >
* On
Off
* On
Off
7 - 30
GS1 DataBar Expanded
GS1 DataBar Expanded Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 4-74. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 74.
* On
Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 31
PosiCode
<Default All PosiCode Settings>
PosiCode A and B
You have to have PosiCode A and B on to read any of the PosiCode symbolo-
gies.
PosiCode Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 2-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
* On
Off
A and B On
(No Limited)
A and B and Limited A On
(Limited B Off)
* A and B and Limited B On
(Limited A Off)
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 32
Trioptic Code
Note: If you are going to scan Code 32 Pharmaceutical codes (page 7-7),
Trioptic Code must be off.
Trioptic Code is used for labeling magnetic storage media.
Codablock F
<Default All Codablock F Settings>
Codablock F
Codablock F Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-2048. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 2048.
On
* Off
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 33
Code 16K
<Default All Code 16K Settings>
Code 16K
Code 16K Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 0-160. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 160.
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 34
Code 49
<Default All Code 49 Settings>
Code 49
Code 49 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-81. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 81.
* On
Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 35
PDF417
< Default All PDF417 Settings >
PDF417
PDF417 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-2750. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 2750.
Off
* On
7 - 36
MicroPDF417
< Default All MicroPDF417 Settings >
MicroPDF417
MicroPDF417 Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-366. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 366.
GS1 Composite Codes
Linear codes are combined with a unique 2D composite component to form a
new class called GS1 Composite symbology. GS1 Composite symbologies
allow for the co-existence of symbologies already in use.
* Off
On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
On
* Off
7 - 37
UPC/EAN Version
Scan the
UPC/EAN Version On bar code to decode GS1 Composite symbols
that have a UPC or EAN linear component. (This does not affect GS1 Compos-
ite symbols with a UCC/EAN-128 or GS1 linear component. If either of these
codes are the linear component, either Code 128 or the correct GS1 code must
be enabled.)
GS1 Composite Code Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-2435. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 2435.
GS1 Emulation
The imager can automatically format the output from any GS1 data carrier to
emulate what would be encoded in an equivalent GS1-128 or GS1 DataBar
symbol. GS1 data carriers include UPC-A and UPC-E, EAN-13 and EAN-8,
ITF-14, GS1-128, and GS1-128 DataBar and GS1 Composites. (Any applica-
tion that accepts GS1 data can be simplified since it only needs to recognize
one data carrier type.)
If GS1-128 Emulation is scanned, all retail codes (UPC, UPC-E, EAN8,
EAN13) are expanded out to 16 digits. If the AIM ID is enabled, the value will
be the GS1-128 AIM ID, ]C1 (see Symbology Chart on page A-1).
If GS1 DataBar Emulation is scanned, all retail codes (UPC, UPC-E, EAN8,
EAN13) are expanded out to 16 digits. If the AIM ID is enabled, the value will
be the GS1-DataBar AIM ID, ]e
m
(see Symbology Chart on page A-1).
If GS1 Code Expansion Off is scanned, retail code expansion is disabled, and
UPC-E expansion is controlled by the UPC-E0 Expand (page 7-21) setting. If
the AIM ID is enabled, the value will be the GS1-128 AIM ID, ]C1 (see
Symbology Chart on page A-1).
UPC/EAN Version On
* UPC/EAN Version Off
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
7 - 38
Default = GS1 Emulation Off
.
TCIF Linked Code 39 (TLC39)
This code is a composite code since it has a Code 39 linear component and a
MicroPDF417 stacked code component. All bar code readers are capable of
reading the Code 39 linear component. The MicroPDF417 component can only
be decoded if TLC39 On is selected. The linear component may be decoded
as Code 39 even if TLC39 is off.
Default = Off.
Postal Codes
Note: For best performance when reading a postal symbology, all other postal
symbologies should be turned off.
Intelligent Mail Bar Code
Note: You may enable the Intelligent Mail Bar Code if you have firmware with a
base number of 31205480. Refer to the Show Software Revision on
page 11-2 for information on determining the firmware revision in your
unit.
GS1 DataBar Emulation
GS1-128 Emulation
* GS1 Emulation Off
GS1 Code Expansion Off
On
* Off
7 - 39
Postal-4i
Note: You may enable Postal-4i if you have firmware with a base number of
31205480. Refer to the Show Software Revision on page 11-2 for
information on determining the firmware revision in your unit.
Postnet
Postnet Check Digit
This selection allows you to specify whether the check digit should be transmit-
ted at the end of the scanned data.
* Off
On
* Off
On
* Off
On
* Don’t Transmit Check Digit
Transmit Check Digit
7 - 40
Planet Code
Planet Code Check Digit
This selection allows you to specify whether the check digit should be transmit-
ted at the end of the scanned data.
* Off
On
* Don’t Transmit Check Digit
Transmit Check Digit
7 - 41
British Post
Canadian Post
Kix (Netherlands) Post
Note: Kix code can misread when scanned sideways or upside down. Use
Working Orientation, page 3-22, if your Kix codes will not usually be
presented upright to the imager.
Australian Post
* Off
On
* Off
On
* Off
On
* Off
On
7 - 42
Australian Post Interpretation
This option controls what interpretation is applied to customer fields in Austra-
lian 4-State symbols.
Bar Output lists the bar patterns in “0123” format.
Numeric N Table causes that field to be interpreted as numeric data using the
N Table.
Alphanumeric C Table causes the field to be interpreted as alphanumeric data
using the C Table. Refer to the Australian Post Specification Tables.
Note: You may enable the Australian Post Interpretation option if you have
firmware with a base number of 31205480. Refer to the Show Software
Revision on page 11-2 for information on determining the firmware
revision in your unit.
Numeric N Table
* Bar Output
Alphanumeric C Table
7 - 43
Japanese Post
China Post
<Default All China Post Settings>
China Post
China Post Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 2-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 80.
* Off
On
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 44
Korea Post
<Default All Korea Post Settings>
Korea Post
Korea Post Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and Maxi-
mum lengths = 2-80. Minimum Default = 4, Maximum Default = 48.
On
* Off
Minimum Message Length
Maximum Message Length
7 - 45
QR Code
< Default All QR Code Settings >
QR Code
This selection applies to both QR Code and Micro QR Code.
Note: The default applies to firmware with a base number of 31205480. Refer
to the Show Software Revision on page 11-2 for information on
determining the firmware revision in your unit
QR Code Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-7089. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 7089.
Off
* On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
7 - 46
Data Matrix
< Default All Data Matrix Settings >
Data Matrix
Data Matrix Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-3116. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 3116.
Off
* On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
7 - 47
MaxiCode
< Default All MaxiCode Settings >
MaxiCode
MaxiCode Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-150. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 150.
Off
* On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
7 - 48
Aztec Code
< Default All Aztec Code Settings >
Aztec Code
Aztec Code Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-3832. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 3832.
Aztec Runes
Select Enable Runes
if you are scanning Aztec runes, which are the smallest
type of Aztec Code symbol with the ability to encode a very short license plate
message.
Off
* On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
* Disable Runes
Enable Runes
7 - 49
Chinese Sensible (Han Xin) Code
< Default All Han Xin Settings >
Han Xin Code
Han Xin Code Message Length
Scan the bar codes below to change the message length. Refer to Message
Length Description (page 7-2) for additional information. Minimum and
Maximum lengths = 1-7833. Minimum Default = 1, Maximum Default = 7833.
* Off
On
Maximum Message Length
Minimum Message Length
7 - 50
8 - 1
8
Imaging Commands
The image scanner is like a digital camera in the way it captures, manipulates,
and transfers images. The following commands allow you to alter the way the
imager performs these functions.
Single-Use Basis
Imaging Commands with their modifiers send instructions to the imager on a
single-use basis, and take effect for a single image capture. Once that capture
is complete, the imager reverts to its imaging default settings. If you want to
permanently change a setting, you must use the serial default commands (see
Chapter 12). When the serial default command is used, that selection becomes
the new, permanent setting for the imager.
Command Syntax
Multiple modifiers and commands can be issued within one sequence. If addi-
tional modifiers are to be applied to the same command, just add the modifiers
to that command. For example, to add 2 modifiers to the Image Snap com-
mand, such as setting the Imaging Style to 1P and the Wait for Trigger to 1T,
you would enter IMGSNP1P1T.
Note: After processing an image capture command (IMGSNP or IMGBOX), you
must follow it with an IMGSHP command if you want to see it on your
terminal.
To add a command to a sequence, each new command is separated with a
semicolon. For example, to add the Image Ship command to the above
sequence, you would enter IMGSNP1P1T;IMGSHP.
The imaging commands are:
Image Snap - IMGSNP (page 8-2)
Image Ship - IMGSHP (page 8-5)
Intelligent Signature Capture - IMGBOX (page 8-14)
The modifiers for each of these commands follow the command description.
Note: The images included with each command description are examples only.
The results you achieve may be different from those included in this
manual. The quality of the output you receive will vary depending on
lighting, quality of the initial image/object being captured, and distance of
the imager from the image/object. To achieve a high quality image, it is
recommended that you position your imager 4-6" (10.16 - 15.24 cm) away
from the image/object you are capturing.
8 - 2
Step 1 - Take a Picture Using IMGSNP
Image Snap - IMGSNP
An image is taken whenever the hardware button is pressed, or when the Image
Snap (IMGSNP) command is processed.
The image snap command has many different modifiers that can be used to
change the look of the image in memory. Modifiers always begin with numbers
and end with a letter (case insensitive). Any number of modifiers may be
appended to the IMGSNP command. For example, you can use the following
command to snap an image, increase the gain, and have the beeper sound
once the snap is complete:
IMGSNP2G1B
IMGSNP Modifiers
P - Imaging Style
This sets the Image Snap style.
0P Decoding Style. This processing allows a few frames to be
taken until the exposure parameters are met. The last frame is
then available for further use.
1P Photo Style
(default).
This mimics a simple digital camera, and
results in a visually optimized image.
2P Manual Style. This is an advanced style that should only be
used by an experienced user. It allows you the most freedom to
set up the imager, and has no auto-exposure.
B - Beeper
Causes a beep to sound after an image is snapped.
0B No beep
(default)
1B Sounds a beep when the image is captured.
T - Wait for Trigger
Waits for a hardware button push before taking the image. This is only
available when using Photo Style (1P).
0T Takes image immediately
(default)
1T Waits for a button push, then takes the image
8 - 3
L - LED State
Determines if the LEDs should be on or off, and when. Ambient illumination
(0L) is preferred for taking pictures of color documents, such as ID cards,
especially when the imager is in a stand. LED illumination (1L) is preferred
when the imager is handheld. LED State is not available when using Decoding
Style (0P).
0L LEDs off
(default)
1L LEDs on
E - Exposure
Exposure is used in Manual Style only (2P), and allows you to set the exposure
time. This is similar to setting a shutter speed on a camera. The exposure
time determines how long the imager takes to record an image. On a bright
day, exposure times can be very short because plenty of light is available to
help record an image. At nighttime, exposure time can increase dramatically
due to the near absence of light. Units are 127 microseconds.
(Default =
7874)
n
E Range: 1 - 7874
Example of Exposure at 7874E with
fluorescent lighting: Example of Exposure at 100E with
fluorescent lighting:
8 - 4
G - Gain
Gain is used in Manual Style only (2P). Like a volume control, the gain
modifier boosts the signal and multiplies the pixel value. As you increase the
gain, the noise in an image is also amplified.
1G No gain
(default)
2G Medium gain
4G Heavy gain
8G Maximum gain
W - Target White Value
Sets the target for the median grayscale value in the captured image. For
capturing close-up images of high contrast documents, a lower setting, such
as 75, is recommended. Higher settings result in longer exposure times and
brighter images, but if the setting is too high, the image may be overexposed.
Target White Value is only available when using Photo Style (1P).
(Default =
125)
n
W Range: 0 - 255
D - Delta for Acceptance
This sets the allowable range for the white value setting (see W - Target White
Value). Delta is only available when using Photo Style (1P).
(Default = 25)
n
D Range: 0 - 255
U - Update Tries
This sets the maximum number of frames the imager should take to reach the
D - Delta for Acceptance. Update Tries is only available when using Photo
Style (1P).
(Default = 6)
n
U Range: 0 - 10
Example of Gain at 1G: Example of Gain at 4G: Example of Gain at 8G:
Example of White
Value at 75W: Example of White
Value at 125W: Example of White
Value at 200W:
8 - 5
% - Target Set Point Percentage
Sets the target point for the light and dark values in the captured image. A
setting of 75% means 75% of the pixels are at or below the target white value,
and 25% of the pixels are above the target white value. Altering this setting
from the default is not recommended under normal circumstances. To alter
grayscale values, W - Target White Value should be used.
(Default = 50)
n% Range: 1 - 99
Step 2 - Ship a Picture Using IMGSHP
Image Ship - IMGSHP
An image is taken whenever the button is pressed, or when the Image Snap
(IMGSNP) command is processed. The last image is always stored in memory.
You can “ship” the image by using the IMGSHP command.
The image ship commands have many different modifiers that can be used to
change the look of the image output. Modifiers affect the image that is transmit-
ted, but do not affect the image in memory. Modifiers always begin with a num-
ber and end with a letter (case insensitive). Any number of modifiers may be
appended to the IMGSHP command. For example, you can use the following
command to snap and ship a bitmap image with gamma correction and docu-
ment image filtering:
IMGSNP;IMGSHP8F75K26U
Example of Target Set
Point Percentage at 97%:
Example of Target Set
Point Percentage at 40%:
Example of Target Set
Point Percentage at 50%:
8 - 6
IMGSHP Modifiers
A - Infinity Filter
Enhances pictures taken from very long distances (greater than 10 feet or
3m). The Infinity Filter should not be used with IMGSHP Modifiers (page 8-6).
0A Infinity filter off
(default)
1A Infinity filter on
C - Compensation
Flattens the image to account for variations in illumination across the image.
0C Compensation disabled
(default)
1C Compensation enabled
D - Pixel Depth
Indicates the number of bits per pixel in the transmitted image (KIM or BMP
format only).
8D 8 bits per pixel, grayscale image
(default)
1D 1 bit per pixel, black and white image
Example of Infinity Filter off (0A)
from approximately 12 feet (3.66m) away: Example of Infinity Filter on (1A)
from approximately 12 feet (3.66m) away:
Example of Compensation at 0C: Example of Compensation at 1C:
8 - 7
E - Edge Sharpen
An edge sharpen filter cleans up the edges of an image, making it look cleaner
and sharper. While edge sharpening does make the image look cleaner, it
also removes some fine detail from the original image. The strength of the
edge sharpen filter can be entered from 1 to 24. Entering a 23E gives the
sharpest edges, but also increases noise in the image.
0E Don’t sharpen image
(default)
14E Apply edge sharpen for typical image
n
e Apply edge sharpen using strength
n
(
n
= 1-24)
F - File Format
Indicates the desired format for the image.
0F KIM format
1F TIFF binary
2F TIFF binary group 4, compressed
3F TIFF grayscale
4F Uncompressed binary (upper left to lower right, 1 pixel/bit, 0
padded end of line)
5F Uncompressed grayscale (upper left to lower right, bitmap
format)
6F JPEG image
(default)
8F BMP format (lower right to upper left, uncompressed)
Example of Edge Sharpen at 0E: Example of Edge Sharpen at 24E:
8 - 8
H - Histogram Stretch
Increases the contrast of the transmitted image. Not available with some
image formats.
0H No stretch
(default)
1H Histogram stretch
I - Invert Image
Invert image is used to rotate the image around the X or Y axis.
1ix Invert around the X axis (flips picture upside down)
1iy Invert around the Y axis (flips picture left to right)
Example of Histogram Stretch at 0H: Example of Histogram Stretch at 1H:
Example of image
with Invert Image set to 1ix:
Example of image not
inverted: Example of image
with Invert Image set to 1iy:
8 - 9
IF- Noise Reduction
Used to reduce the salt and pepper noise in an image.
0if No salt and pepper noise reduction (default)
1if Salt and pepper noise reduction
IR - Image Rotate
0ir Image as snapped (rightside up) (default)
1ir Rotate image 90 degrees to the right
2ir Rotate image 180 degrees (upside down)
3ir Rotate image 90 degrees to the left
Example of Noise Reduction On (1if):Example of Noise Reduction Off (0if):
Example of Image Rotate set to 0
ir
:Example of Image Rotate set to 2
ir
:
Example of Image Rotate set to 1
ir
:Example of Image Rotate set to 3
ir
:
8 - 10
J - JPEG Image Quality
Sets the desired quality when the JPEG image format is selected. Higher
numbers result in higher quality, but larger files. Smaller numbers result in
greater amounts of lossy compression, faster transmission times, lower
quality, but smaller files.
(Default = 50)
n
J Image is compressed as much as possible while preserving
quality factor of
n
(
n
= 0 - 100)
0J worst quality (smallest file)
100J best quality (largest file)
K - Gamma Correction
Gamma measures the brightness of midtone values produced by the image.
You can brighten or darken an image using gamma correction. A higher
gamma correction yields an overall brighter image. The lower the setting, the
darker the image. The optimal setting for text images is 50K.
0K Gamma correction off
(default)
50K Apply gamma correction for brightening typical document image
n
K Apply gamma correction factor
n
(
n
= 0-1,000)
L, R, T, B, M - Image Cropping
Note: Image Cropping should not be used with IMGSHP Modifiers (see
page 8-6).
Ships a window of the image by specifying the left, right, top, and bottom pixel
coordinates. Device columns are numbered 0 through 640, and device rows
are numbered 0 through 480.
n
L The left edge of the shipped image corresponds to column
n
of
the image in memory. Range: 000 - 640.
(Default = 0)
n
R The right edge of the shipped image corresponds to column
n
-
1 of the image in memory. Range: 000 - 640.
(Default = all
columns)
n
T The top edge of the shipped image corresponds to row
n
of the
image in memory. Range: 000 - 480.
(Default = 0)
Example of Gamma
Correction set to 50K:
Example of Gamma
Correction set to 0K: Example of Gamma
Correction set to 255K:
8 - 11
n
B The bottom edge of the shipped image corresponds to row
n
- 1
of the image in memory. Range: 000 - 480.
(Default = all rows)
Alternately, specify the number of pixels to cut from the outside margin of the
image; thus only the center pixels are transmitted.
n
M Margin: cut
n
columns from the left,
n
+ 1 columns from the right,
n
rows from the top, and
n
+ 1 rows from the bottom of the image.
Ship the remaining center pixels. Range: 0 - 238.
(Default = 0, or full image)
P - Protocol
Used for shipping an image. Protocol covers two features of the image data
being sent to the host. It addresses the protocol used to send the data
(Hmodem, which is an Xmodem 1K variant that has additional header
information), and the format of the image data that is sent.
0P None (raw data)
2P None
(default for USB)
3P Hmodem compressed
(default for RS-232)
4P Hmodem
Example of Image
Crop set to 300L:
Example of Image
Crop set to 300R:
Uncropped Image:
Example of Image Crop set to 200T:
Example of Image Crop set to 200B:
Example of Image
Crop set to 238M:
8 - 12
S - Pixel Ship
Pixel Ship sizes an image in proportion to its original size. It decimates the
image by shipping only certain, regularly spaced pixels. For example, 4S
would transmit every fourth pixel from every fourth line. The smaller number
of pixels shipped, the smaller the image, however, after a certain point the
image becomes unusable.
1S ship every pixel
(default)
2S ship every 2nd pixel, both horizontally and vertically
3S ship every 3rd pixel, both horizontally and vertically
U - Document Image Filter
Allows you to input parameters to sharpen the edges and smooth the area
between the edges of text in an image. This filter should be used with gamma
correction (see page 8-10), with the imager in a stand, and the image captured
using the command:
IMGSNP1P0L168W90%32D
This filter typically provides better JPEG compression than the standard E -
Edge Sharpen command (see page 8-14). This filter also works well when
shipping pure black and white images (1 bit per pixel). The optimal setting is
26U.
0U Document image filter off
(default)
26U Apply document image filter for typical document image
Example of Pixel Ship set to 1S: Example of Pixel Ship
set to 2S: Example of Pixel
Ship set to 3S:
8 - 13
n
U Apply document image filter using grayscale threshold n. Use
lower numbers when the image contrast is lower. 1U will have a
similar effect to setting E - Edge Sharpen (page 8-7) to 22e.
Range: 0-255.
V - Blur Image
Smooths transitions by averaging the pixels next to the hard edges of defined
lines and shaded areas in an image.
0V Don’t blur
(default)
1V Blur
Example of Document Image
Filter set to 0U: Example of Document Image
Filter set to 26U:
Example of Blur Image Off (0
V
): Example of Blur Image On (1
V
):
8 - 14
W - Histogram Ship
A histogram gives a quick picture of the tonal range of an image, or key type.
A low-key image has detail concentrated in the shadows; a high-key image
has detail concentrated in the highlights; and an average-key image has detail
concentrated in the midtones. This modifier ships the histogram for an image.
0W Don’t ship histogram
(default)
1W Ship histogram
Intelligent Signature Capture - IMGBOX
IMGBOX allows you to configure the size and location of a signature capture
area relative to its proximity to a bar code. This allows you to tailor a signature
capture area to a specific form. In order to use IMGBOX, you need a set form
where the signature box location is in a known location relative to a bar code.
You can input the overall size of the signature area, as well as specify how far
the signature area is from the bar code, vertically and horizontally. You can also
set the resolution and file format for the final output of the signature capture
image.
Note: IMGBOX commands can only be triggered by one of the following types of
bar codes: PDF417, Code 39, Code 128, Aztec, Codabar, and Interleaved
2 of 5. Once one of these symbologies has been read, the image is
retained for a possible IMGBOX command.
The following IMGBOX example was executed and viewed using QuickView
software. This software is available at www.honeywellaidc.com. Click on Soft-
ware Downloads. Select your device from the Products list, then select Quick-
View Software Utility.
Below is an example of a signature capture application. In this example, the
aimer is centered over the signature capture area and the trigger is pressed. A
single beep is emitted, indicating that the imager has read a Code 128 bar code
and the data has been transferred to the host. An IMGBOX command may now
be sent from the host to specify the coordinates of the signature capture area
below that code, and indicating that only that area containing the signature
should be transferred as an image to the host.
Image used for histogram: Histogram of image at left:
8 - 15
To see this example, align the aimer with the signature area (not with the bar
code), then press the trigger.
Send the following IMGBOX command string after the button push:
IMGBOX245w37h55y.
Note: Case is not important in the command string. It is used here only for clarity.
The following image is captured:
The IMGBOX commands have many different modifiers that can be used to
change the size and appearance of the signature image output by the imager.
Modifiers affect the image that is transmitted, but do not affect the image in
memory. Modifiers always begin with a number and end with a letter (case
insensitive). Any number of modifiers may be appended to the IMGBOX com-
mand.
Note: The IMGBOX command will return a NAK unless a window size (width and
height) are specified. See H - Height of Signature Capture Area (page 8-
16) and W - Width of Signature Capture Area (page 8-18).
IMGBOX Modifiers
A - Output Image Width
This option is used to size the image horizontally. If using this option, set the
resolution (R) to zero.
Example of Image Width set to 200A:
Example of Image Width set to 600A:
8 - 16
B - Output Image Height
This option is used to size the image vertically. If using this option, set the
resolution (R) to zero.
D - Pixel Depth
This indicates the number of bits per pixel in the transmitted image, which
defines whether it will be grayscale or black and white.
8D 8 bits per pixel, grayscale image
(default)
1D 1 bit per pixel, black and white image
F - File Format
This option indicates the type of file format in which to save the image.
0F KIM format
1F TIFF binary
2F TIFF binary group 4, compressed
3F TIFF grayscale
4F Uncompressed Binary
5F Uncompressed grayscale
6F JPEG image
(default)
7F Outlined image
8F BMP format
H - Height of Signature Capture Area
The height of the signature capture area must be measured in inches divided
by .01. In the example, the height of the area to be captured is 3/8 inch,
resulting in a value of H = .375/0.01 = 37.5.
Example of Image Height set to 50B:
Example of Image Height set to 100B:
Example: IMGBOX245w37h55y.
8 - 17
K - Gamma Correction
Gamma measures the brightness of midtone values produced by the image.
You can brighten or darken an image using gamma correction. A higher
gamma correction yields an overall brighter image. The lower the setting, the
darker the image. The optimal setting for text images is 50K.
0K Gamma correction off
(default)
50K Apply gamma correction for brightening typical document image
n
K Apply gamma correction factor
n
(
n
= 1-255)
Example of Gamma Correction
set to 50K:
Example of Gamma Correction
set to 0K:
Example of Gamma Correction
set to 255K:
8 - 18
R - Resolution of Signature Capture Area
The resolution is the number of pixels that the imager outputs per each
minimum bar width. The higher the value for R, the higher the quality of the
image, but also the larger the file size. Values begin at 1000. The imager
automatically inserts a decimal point between the first and second digit. For
example, use 2500 to specify a resolution of 2.5. Set to zero when using the
A and B modifiers (see A - Output Image Width and B - Output Image
Height on page 8-16).
S - Bar Code Aspect Ratio
All dimensions used in IMGBOX are measured as multiples of the minimum
element size of the bar code. The bar code aspect ratio allows you to set the
ratio of the bar code height to the narrow element width. In the example, the
narrow element width is .010 inches and the bar code height is 0.400 inches,
resulting in a value of S = 0.4/0.01 = 40.
W - Width of Signature Capture Area
The width of the signature capture area must be measured in inches divided
by .01. In the example, the width of the area to be captured is 2.4 inches,
resulting in a value of W = 2.4/0.01 = 240. (A value of 245 was used in the
example to accommodate a slightly wider image area.)
Example of Resolution set to 1000R:
Example of Resolution set to 0R:
Example of Resolution set to 2000R:
Example: IMGBOX245w37h55y.
8 - 19
X - Horizontal Bar Code Offset
The horizontal bar code offset allows you to offset the horizontal center of the
signature capture area. Positive values move the horizontal center to the right
and negative values to the left. Measurements are in multiples of the minimum
bar width.
Y - Vertical Bar Code Offset
The vertical bar code offset allows you to offset the vertical center of the
signature capture area. Negative numbers indicate that the signature capture
is above the bar code, and positive numbers indicate that the area is below the
bar code. Measurements are in multiples of the minimum bar width.
Example of Horizontal Offset set to -75X:
Example of Horizontal Offset set to 75X:
Example of Vertical Offset set to -7Y:
Example of Vertical Offset set to 65Y:
8 - 20
9 - 1
9
OCR Programming
Use this section to program the imager for optical character recognition (OCR).
The 2D imager reads 6 to 60 point OCR typeface.
Note: OCR is not as secure as bar codes. To enhance security in OCR
applications, create an OCR template to match the data, and print an
OCR check character.
The 2D imager will read OCR-A, OCR-B, U.S. Currency Serial Number
(Money), MICR E-13B, and SEMI Font.
You can either select an OCR default, or create your own custom template for
the type of OCR format you intend to read. See "OCR" on page 9-1 for pro-
gramming codes that will enable your imager to read OCR-A, OCR-B, U.S. Cur-
rency, MICR E 13 B, or SEMI fonts. See "OCR Templates" on page 9-3 if you
want to create a custom “template,” or character string that defines the length
and content of OCR strings that will be read with your imager.
Note: Setting the template and check character options are essential for OCR
reading.
OCR Fonts
Default All OCR Settings turns off all OCR capability in the imager, so the
imager will be able to scan linear, stacked, matrix, and composite bar codes, but
not OCR fonts. In addition, any OCR templates you have created are erased.
The eight digit default templates are reinstated for any future use of the OCR
On codes listed below.
< Default All OCR Settings >
OCR
Note: OCR symbols can misread when scanned sideways or upside down. Use
Working Orientation, page 3-22, if your OCR symbols will not usually be
presented upright to the imager.
Only one OCR symbology can be read at a time.
OCR-A On allows you to scan characters in the OCR-A font. The default set-
ting allows you to scan any eight digit combination. If you have created an OCR
template, character combinations that fit the template can be scanned (see
Creating an OCR Template, page 9-3).
OCR-A On
9 - 2
OCR-B On allows you to scan characters in the OCR-B font. The default set-
ting allows you to scan any eight digit combination. If you have created an OCR
template, character combinations that fit the template can be scanned (see
Creating an OCR Template, page 9-3).
U.S. Currency Font
U.S. Currency On allows you to scan characters in the font used on U.S. cur-
rency. The default setting allows you to scan any eight digit combination. If you
have created an OCR template, character combinations that fit the template can
be scanned (see Creating an OCR Template, page 9-3).
MICR E13 B Font
MICR E13 B On allows you to scan MICR characters on a bank check. The
default setting allows you to scan any eight digit combination. If you have cre-
ated an OCR template, character combinations that fit the template can be
scanned (see Creating an OCR Template, page 9-3).
Note: TOAD characters (Transit, On Us, Amount and Dash) are output in the
following manner:
OCR-B On
U.S. Currency On
MICR E 13 B On
the transit character is output as T
the amount character is output as A
the on us character is output as O
the dash character is output as D
9 - 3
SEMI Font
SEMI Font On allows you to scan the SEMI font used in the semiconductor
industry.
All OCR Off turns off all OCR capability in the imager, so the imager will be able
to scan linear, stacked, matrix, and composite bar codes, but not OCR fonts.
However, any OCR templates you have created will be retained in memory.
OCR Templates
You can create a custom “template,” or character string that defines the length
and content of OCR strings that will be read with your imager. There are sev-
eral choices when creating a custom template for your application. You can cre-
ate a template for a single format, you can string together several formats, and
you can create a template for a user-defined variable. These choices are
described in detail below.
Creating an OCR Template
A single template allows you to program the imager to read any combination of
characters in the order you specify. Refer to examples that follow the Template
Characters table below.
SEMI Font On
* All OCR Off
9 - 4
Template Characters
Note: OCR templates default to eight digits, no check character.
To Add an OCR Template
1. Turn on the OCR font you want to read (page 9-1).
2. Begin building the template.
Scan the
Enter OCR Template symbol (page 9-13).
3. Scan the characters for the string.
Use the Template Characters chart above to determine what characters you
need to create your format. Use the OCR Programming Chart (after the
Sample Codes in the back of this manual) to scan the characters for your
template.
Example: You need to read any combination of eight digits. The template
would be:
dddddddd
To create this template, you would enable the OCR-A font. Scan the Enter
OCR Template symbol (page 9-13), then scan the
d
from the OCR
Programming Chart in the back of this manual eight times. Scan Save OCR
Template (page 9-13). This would let you read any string of eight digits, for
example:
37680981
a represents any alphanumeric character (digit or letter)
c represents that a check character is verified but not transmitted
d represents any digit
e represents any available OCR character
g represents character from user-defined variable “g”
h represents character from user-defined variable “h”
i represents character from user-defined variable “g” or “h”
k represents that a check character is verified but transmitted
l represents any uppercase letter
t marks the start of a new template
r multi row indicator
All other characters represent themselves. Spaces can be used.
Note: In MICR E13 B templates, TOAD characters (capital letters T, O, A, and D),
represent Transit, On Us, Amount, and Dash.
9 - 5
Character Match Sequences
This method is used if you need a template that shows a specific character in
a specific position. Put the character in uppercase in the template at the
required position (template characters are always lower case).
Example: You need to read three variable digits, three specific characters
(ABC), followed by three variable digits. The template would be:
dddABCddd
Using Visual Xpress (see page 11-4), you can enter the template as shown
above, enclosing the whole string between quotes: “dddABCddd”.
You may also create this character match sequence by scanning bar codes.
Scan the Enter OCR Template symbol (page 9-13). Scan the
d
from the
OCR Programming Chart in the back of this manual three times. Then scan
414243 from the inside back cover (the hex characters for “A,” “B,” and “C”),
and scan the
d
three more times. Scan Save OCR Template
,
page 9-13.
This would let you read any string of three digits, “ABC,” then any string of
three digits, for example:
551ABC983
(The above OCR sample is OCR-A. You must enable the OCR-A font (page
9-1) in order to read it.)
Adding Spaces
You may also need to put spaces in your template. A space is seen as a
character, therefore you can use the directions for Character Match
Sequences, above, to add spaces to a string. (The hex value for a space is
20.)
4. Exit OCR Template Editor
Scan Save OCR Template to save your entries. Discard OCR Template
exits without saving any OCR Template changes.
Stringing Together Multiple Formats
(Creating “Or” Statements)
You may want to program the imager to accept many OCR formats. To do this,
you would string together each format with a “t.” This tells the imager to read
optical characters that match any one of the formats in the template.
Example: You need to read any combination of eight digits,
or
a combination
of four digits, two uppercase letters, and two digits. The template
would be:
ddddddddtddddlldd
9 - 6
To create this template, you would enable the OCR-A font. Scan the Enter
OCR Template symbol (page 9-13). Scan the
d
from the OCR Programming
Chart in the back of this manual eight times, then scan the t to create the “or”
statement. Then you would scan the characters for the second template.
Scan
d
four times, scan l
two times
, then scan d two more times. Scan Save
OCR Template (page 9-13). This would let you read either type of format, for
example:
99028650
or
9902XZ50
You can string together as many templates as you need.
OCR User-Defined Variables
You can create up to two of your own user variables for an OCR template.
These variables will represent any OCR readable characters. The user-defined
variables are stored under the letters “g” and “h.” You need a variable to repre-
sent the letters “A,” “B,” or “C.” The template for this user-defined variable
would be:
ABC
Using Visual Xpress (see page 11-4), you can enter the string as shown above
into the “G variable” text box. You must enclose the strings between quotes:
“ABC”.
You may also create this user-defined variable by scanning bar codes. Scan
the Enter User-Defined Variable g symbol (page 9-13). Then scan 414243
from the inside back cover (the hex characters for “A,” “B,” and “C”), Scan Save
OCR Template
,
page 9-13. This will let you read either A or B or C in any posi-
tion where you place the g in the template. For example, you could create the
following template:
ddddddggg
(Using Visual Xpress, you must enter “ddddddggg” in the Template text box.)
This template would then let you read data that began with six digits, and had
an A, B, or C trailing. So you would be able to read:
654321ABC
or
654321BAC
or
654321CCC
(The above OCR sample is OCR-A. You must enable the OCR-A font (page 9-
1) in order to read it.)
9 - 7
Reading Multi-Row OCR
The imager is capable of decoding multi-row OCR text.
Note: Reading rows longer than sixteen characters is not recommended.
Consider the following example. This example shows serial commands as they
would be entered using Quick*View.
Example: You need to read multiple rows of OCR-A data as shown below:
12345678
ABCDEFGH
First, enable the OCR-A font. To read the first row of OCR data, you would
program the following template:
OCRTMP"dddddddd".
This template is the default OCR template. If you wanted to read the second
line of data, you would use the following template:
OCRTMP"llllllll".
To read both lines of OCR at one time, use the variable
r
to indicate the start
of a new row. All the other templating variables for the individual rows work
the same as previously described. For instance, in the above example, you
would use the following template to read both rows:
OCRTMP"ddddddddrllllllll".
To read the three rows below, you would use the template command
"OCRTMP"ddddddddrllllllllrlllldddd".
12345678
ABCDEFGH
ABCD1234
OCR Check Character
You may want to print and verify a check character in order to enhance the
security of your OCR application. The imager can be programmed for almost
any type of check character. A number of presets are provided for common
check character uses (e.g., modulo 10 and modulo 36).
Scan the OCR Modulo 10 or OCR Modulo 36 Check Character bar code to
specify the type of check character used in the OCR strings you’re scanning.
The imager will then only read OCR character strings with a valid check charac-
ter. The imager transmits the OCR data without the check character data. You
must specify the location of the check character in the template with a c.
9 - 8
Example: You need to read any combination of seven digits, with a modulo 10
check character in the eighth position. The template would be:
dddddddc
To create this template, you would enable the OCR-A font. Scan the Modulo
10 Check Character
symbol. Then scan the Enter OCR Template symbol,
and scan the d from the OCR Programming Chart seven times, and scan the
c
once. Scan Save OCR Template (page 9-13). This template will let you
read any combination of six digits with a correct check character after. (If the
check character is invalid, the data is discarded.) For example, the following
string could be scanned:
01234569
and the output would be: 0123456
OCR Modulo 10 Check Character
Scan this symbol to program the OCR template for a simple modulo 10 check-
sum of the digits 0 through 9.
OCR Modulo 36 Check Character
Scan this symbol to program the OCR template for a simple modulo 36 check-
sum of the digits 0 through 9 and the letters A through Z.
OCR User-Defined Check Character
You can customize the check character calculation to suit your application.
Each character of the check character alphabet can be programmed in its
proper order. The number of characters you enter determines the modulo value
for the calculation. By default, the check character computation is unweighted,
but the imager also supports two weighted modulo 10 checking schemes.
Example:
To program a modulo 11 check character, you would enter the
following 11 characters in order:
OCR Modulo 10 Check Character
OCR Modulo 36 Check Character
9 - 9
0123456789X
Also enter the OCR template:
dddddddc
Enable the OCR-A font, then scan the following string:
6512351X
The imager performs the following check character computation:
(6 + 5 + 1 + 2 +3 + 5 + 1 + X) modulo 11 = 0
Since the result is zero, the message is considered to be valid, so the reader
outputs the message: 6512351
Programming a User-Defined Check Character
1. Scan the Enter OCR Check Character bar code, below.
2. Enter the characters in order. For each character, look up the corresponding
hex value from the ASCII Conversion Chart (Code Page 1252), page A-4.
Use the Programming Chart on the inside the back cover of this manual to
scan the two symbols for each hex value.
3. Scan the Save bar code on the inside back cover.
Example: To program the modulo 11 check character from example #8 on
page 9-8, enable the OCR-A font. Scan the Enter OCR Check
Character bar code on page 9-9, then scan the following hex values
in order:
3031323334353637383958
After you enter all the desired hex values, scan the Save bar code on the
inside back cover of this manual.
Weighting Options
By default, the check character computation is unweighted. It is possible to use
one of two weighted modulo 10 schemes. Weighting is often used to detect if
two neighboring characters are transposed, a common error when an operator
keys in data.
Enter OCR Check Character
9 - 10
3-1-3-1 Weighted Modulo 10 Check Character
Starting with the check character and working backward through the message,
the imager applies a multiplier of 1, then 3, then 1, then 3, and so on. This is
the checking scheme used in many GS1 symbologies, including U.P.C. and
Interleaved 2 of 5 (when a check digit is invoked). To apply this weighting
scheme, set the OCR check character to “0123456789x3x1” or scan the fol-
lowing symbol:
Example: Scan the 3-1-3-1 Weighted Modulo 10 Check Character symbol. Also
enter the OCR template:
dddddddc
Then scan the string below:
01234565
The reader performs the check character computation below:
(0 x 3 + 1 x 1 + 2 x 3 + 3 x 1 + 4 x 3 + 5 x 1 + 6 x 3 + 5 x 1) modulo 10 = 0
Since the result is zero, the message is considered to be valid, so the reader
outputs the message: 0123456
2-1-2-1 Weighted Modulo 10 Check Character
Starting with the check character and working backward through the message,
the imager applies a multiplier of 1, then 2, then 1, then 2, and so on. When the
result of the multiplication is greater than 9, add both digits to the running sum.
This is often referred to as the LUHN formula. One common application of the
LUHN formula is validate credit card numbers. This is the modulo 10 checking
scheme used in MSI Code and in Code 32 Pharmaceutical (PARAF). To apply
this weighting scheme, set the OCR check character to "0123456789x2x1" or
scan the following symbol:
Example: Scan the 2-1-2-1 Weighted Modulo 10 Check Character symbol. Also
enter the OCR template:
ddddddc
3-1-3-1 Weighted Modulo 10
Check Character
2-1-2-1 Weighted Modulo 10
Check Character
9 - 11
Then scan the string below:
0128454
The reader performs the check character computation below:
(0 x 1 + 1 x 2 + 2 x 1 + 8 x 2 + 4 x 1 + 5 x 2 + 4 x 1) modulo 10
= (0 + 2 + 2 + (1 + 6) + 4 + (1 + 0) + 4) modulo 10
= 0
Since the result is zero, the message is considered to be valid, so the reader
outputs the message: 012845
OCR ISBN Application Example
One application of OCR is to read the ISBN characters typically encoded using
the OCR-A or OCR-B font. This is especially useful when the ISBN number is
not encoded in an EAN-13 bar code. The following example shows how to con-
figure the imager to read the ISBN strings on books in Japan. After you have
followed the steps below, you will be able to scan the following ISBN number or
the additional data below it, depending on the line of text at which the imager is
aimed.
1. Scan the OCR-B On bar code on page 9-2.
2. Program the user-defined variable “g” to comprise the ten digits plus the
dash:
0123456789-
3. In Japan, it is common for two fields to follow the ISBN number, the three
digit price field, and the four digit price field. The first field typically starts
with a “C” (uppercase c), followed by four digits. The second field typically
starts with a “P” or a yen symbol, followed by three or four digits, followed by
an “E.” Program the user-defined variable “h” to comprise the “P” and the
yen symbol (represented by a backslash).
P\
9 - 12
4. Scan the symbol below to set up three templates to handle the ISBN
number, the three digit price field, and the four digit price field.
5. Finally, set up the ISBN check digit, which is a special position-weighted
modulo 11 checksum. The imager automatically invokes the ISBN
checksum for template rows that are:
1.) at least fourteen characters long,
2.) whose first four characters are the letters “ISBN,”
3.) whose last character is a check character, and
4.) when the modulo 11 check character “0123456789X” is programmed.
Note that all these commands can be combined into a single serial program-
ming command:
OCRENA2,TMP”ISBNggggggggggggctCdddd hdddEtCdddd
hddddE”,GPG”0123456789-”,GPH”P\”,CHK”0123456789X”.
These commands can be encoded into the following Aztec Code symbol:
9 - 13
OCR Template Codes
Note: Reading more than three rows of OCR is not recommended. Contact the
factory if you have an application that requires reading four or more rows
of OCR.
One or more two-digit numbers and Save are required after reading this pro-
gramming symbol. Refer to the Programming Chart on the inside the back
cover of this manual.
Exit Selections
Enter OCR Template
Enter User-Defined
Variable “h”
Enter User-Defined
Variable “g”
Save OCR Template
Discard OCR Template
9 - 14
10 - 1
10
Interface Keys
Keyboard Function Relationships
The following Keyboard Function Code, Hex/ASCII Value, and Full ASCII
“CTRL”+ relationships apply to all terminals that can be used with the imager.
Refer to page 2-7 enable Control + ASCII mode.
Function Code HEX/ASCII Value Full ASCII “CTRL” +
NUL 00 @
SOH 01 A
STX 02 B
ETX 03 C
EOT 04 D
ENQ 05 E
ACK 06 F
BEL 07 G
BS 08 H
HT 09 I
LF 0A J
VT 0B K
FF 0C L
CR 0D M
SO 0E N
SI 0F O
DLE 10 P
DC1 11 Q
DC2 12 R
DC3 13 S
DC4 14 T
NAK 15 U
SYN 16 V
ETB 17 W
CAN 18 X
EM 19 Y
SUB 1A Z
ESC 1B [
FS 1C \
GS 1D ]
RS 1E ^
US 1F _
10 - 2
The last five characters in the Full ASCII “CTRL”+ column ( [ \ ] 6 - ), apply to
US only. The following chart indicates the equivalents of these five characters
for different countries.
Country Codes
United States [ \ ] 6 -
Belgium [<]6-
Scandinavia 8 < 9 6 -
France ^ 8 $ 6 =
Germany à + 6 -
Italy \ + 6 -
Switzerland <. . 6 -
United Kingdom [ ¢ ] 6 -
Denmark 8 \ 9 6 -
Norway 8 \ 9 6 -
Spain [ \ ] 6 -
10 - 3
Supported Interface Keys
ASCII HEX
IBM AT/XT and
PS/2 Compatibles,
WYSE PC/AT
Supported Keys
IBM XTs and
Compatibles
Supported Keys
IBM, DDC, Memorex
Telex, Harris*
Supported Keys
NUL 00 Reserved Reserved Reserved
SOH 01 Enter (KP) CR/Enter Enter
STX 02 Cap Lock Caps Lock F11
ETX 03 ALT make Reserved F12
EOT 04 ALT break Reserved F13
ENQ 05 CTRL make Reserved F14
ACK 06 CTRL break Reserved F15
BEL 07 CR/Enter CR/Enter New Line
BS 08 Reserved Reserved F16
HT 09 Tab Tab F17
LF 0A Reserved Reserved F18
VT 0B Tab Tab Tab/Field Forward
FF 0C Delete Delete Delete
CR 0D CR/Enter CR/Enter Field Exit/New Line
SO 0E Insert Insert Insert
SI 0F Escape Escape F19
DLE 10 F11 Reserved Error Reset
DC1 11 Home Home Home
DC2 12 Print Print F20
DC3 13 Back Space Back Space Back Space
DC4 14 Back Tab Back Tab Backfield/Back Tab
NAK 15 F12 Reserved F21
SYN 16 F1 F1 F1
ETB 17 F2 F2 F2
CAN 18 F3 F3 F3
EM 19 F4 F4 F4
SUB 1A F5 F5 F5
ESC 1B F6 F6 F6
FS 1C F7 F7 F7
GS 1D F8 F8 F8
RS 1E F9 F9 F9
US 1F F10 F10 F10
* IBM 3191/92, 3471/72, 3196/97, 3476/77, Telex (all models)
10 - 4
Supported Interface Keys
ASCII HEX IBM, Memorex Telex (102)*
Supported Keys Memorex Telex (88)**
Supported Keys
NUL 00 Reserved Reserved
SOH 01 Enter Enter
STX 02 F11 PF10
ETX 03 F12 PF11
EOT 04 F13 PF12
ENQ 05 F14 Reserved
ACK 06 F15 Reserved
BEL 07 New Line New Line
BS 08 F16 Field Forward
HT 09 F17 Field Forward
LF 0A F18 Reserved
VT 0B Tab/Field Forward Field Forward
FF 0C Delete Delete
CR 0D Field Exit New Line
SO 0E Insert Insert
SI 0F Clear Erase
DLE 10 Error Reset Error Reset
DC1 11 Home Reserved
DC2 12 Print Print
DC3 13 Back Space Back Space
DC4 14 Back Tab Back Field
NAK 15 F19 Reserved
SYN 16 F1 PF1
ETB 17 F2 PF2
CAN 18 F3 PF3
EM 19 F4 PF4
SUB 1A F5 PF5
ESC 1B F6 PF6
FS 1C F7 PF7
GS 1D F8 PF8
RS 1E F9 PF9
US 1F F10 Home
* IBM 3196/97, 3476/77, 3191/92, 3471/72, Memorex Telex (all models) with 102
key keyboards
** Memorex Telex with 88 key keyboards
10 - 5
Supported Interface Keys
ASCII HEX
Esprit 200, 400
ANSI
Supported Keys
Esprit 200, 400
ASCII
Supported Keys
Esprit 200, 400
PC
Supported Keys
NUL 00 Reserved Reserved Reserved
SOH 01 New Line New Line New Line
STX 02 N/A N/A N/A
ETX 03 N/A N/A N/A
EOT 04 N/A N/A N/A
ENQ 05 N/A N/A N/A
ACK 06 N/A N/A N/A
BEL 07 New Line New Line New Line
BS 08 N/A N/A N/A
HT 09 Tab Tab Tab
LF 0A N/A N/A N/A
VT 0B Tab Tab Tab
FF 0C N/A N/A Delete
CR 0D New Line New Line New Line
SO 0E N/A N/A Insert
SI 0F Escape Escape Escape
DLE 10 F11 F11 F11
DC1 11 Insert Insert Home
DC2 12 F13 F13 Print
DC3 13 Back Space Back Space Back Space
DC4 14 Back Tab Back Tab Back Tab
NAK 15 F12 F12 F12
SYN 16 F1 F1 F1
ETB 17 F2 F2 F2
CAN 18 F3 F3 F3
EM 19 F4 F4 F4
SUB 1A F5 F5 F5
ESC 1B F6 F6 F6
FS 1C F7 F7 F7
GS 1D F8 F8 F8
RS 1E F9 F9 F9
US 1F F10 F10 F10
10 - 6
Supported Interface Keys
ASCII HEX
Apple Mac/iMac
Supported Keys
NUL 00 Reserved
SOH 01 Enter/Numpad Enter
STX 02 CAPS
ETX 03 ALT make
EOT 04 ALT break
ENQ 05 CNTRL make
ACK 06 CNTRL break
BEL 07 RETURN
BS 08 APPLE make
HT 09 TAB
LF 0A APPLE break
VT 0B TAB
FF 0C Del
CR 0D RETURN
SO 0E Ins Help
SI 0F ESC
DLE 10 F11
DC1 11 Home
DC2 12 Prnt Scrn
DC3 13 BACKSPACE
DC4 14 LSHIFT TAB
NAK 15 F12
SYN 16 F1
ETB 17 F2
CAN 18 F3
EM 19 F4
SUB 1A F5
ESC 1B F6
FS 1C F7
GS 1D F8
RS 1E F9
US 1F F10
DEL 7F BACKSPACE
11 - 1
11
Utilities
To Add a Test Code I.D. Prefix to All Symbologies
This selection allows you to turn on transmission of a Code I.D. before the
decoded symbology. (See the Symbology Chart, page A-1, for the single char-
acter code that identifies each symbology.) This action first clears all current
prefixes, then programs a Code I.D. prefix for all symbologies. This is a tempo-
rary setting that will be removed when the unit is power cycled.
Show Decoder Revision
Scan the bar code below to output the decoder revision.
Note: You may use the Show Decoder Revision option if you have firmware with
a base number of 31205480. Refer to Show Software Revision on page
11-2 for information on determining the firmware revision in your unit.
Show Engine Revision
Note: You may use the Show Engine Revision option if you have firmware with
a base number of 31205480.
Scan the bar code below to output the engine revision. Your imager returns the
engine type, revision number, and status character [ACK]. For example, an
imager with a 5100 engine, version 26 would return:
ENGREVType: 1 Revision: 26[ACK]
Add Code I.D. Prefix to
All Symbologies (Temporary)
Show Decoder Revision
Show Engine Revision
11 - 2
Show Scan Driver Revision
Scan the bar code below to output the scan driver revision. The scan driver
controls image capture.
You may use the Show Scan Driver Revision option if you have firmware with a
base number of 31205480. Refer to the Show Software Revision below for
information on determining the firmware revision in your unit.
Show Software Revision
Scan the bar code below to output the current software revision, unit serial num-
ber, and other product information.
Show Data Format
Scan the bar code below to show current data format settings.
Resetting the Standard Product Defaults
If you aren’t sure what programming options are in your imager, or you’ve
changed some options and want the standard product default settings restored,
scan the Standard Product Default Settings bar code below.
The Menu Commands starting on page 12-4 lists the standard product default
settings for each of the commands (indicated by an asterisk (*) on the program-
ming pages).
Show Scan Driver Revision
Show Software Revision
Data Format Settings
Standard Product Default Settings
11 - 3
Test Menu
When you scan the Test Menu On code, then scan a programming code in this
manual, the imager displays the content of a programming code. The program-
ming function will still occur, but in addition, the content of that programming
code is output to the terminal.
Note: This feature should not be used during normal imager operation.
2D PQA (Print Quality Assessment)
Two-dimensional Print Quality Assessment (2D PQA) is a feature of Honeywell’
image readers where the data from the successful read of a 2D bar code sym-
bol is augmented with lines of text that both identify the symbol, and also report
graded measurement parameters obtained from it.
2D PQA Reporting
Honeywell' 2D PQA reporting can be enabled in two different modes: Full
Report or Screening. (To see displayed results, Microsoft® Notepad, a word
processor/editing program, or Quick*View (page 11-6) is recommended.)
If you are using Quick*View, you can enable Full Report, a listing of all of a sym-
bol's identifying information, measurements, and corresponding grades, by typ-
ing the following menu command:
2D_PQA1
or by scanning the following bar code:
Note: The PQA report is sent out as a second data/beep sequence after the bar
code data. The report has its own Honeywell code ID of >(0X3E) so it can
be uniquely identified.
On
* Off
Full Report
11 - 4
You can exit Full Report mode by either typing the menu command, 2D_PQA0,
if you are using Quick*View, or by scanning the following bar code:
Note: For additional information on interpreting your read results, refer to
Honeywell Quick Check 2D Print Assessment User’s Guide.
Visual Xpress Introduction
Note: Software revision 31205480-118 or higher is backward compatible with
all non-advanced illumination units. This new revision of software can be
flashed in non-advanced illumination units for full backward compatibility.
Software 31205480-090 or lower cannot be flashed into units with
advanced illumination. Visual Xpress will display an incompatibility error
message.
Visual Xpress provides a wide range of PC-based programming functions that
can be performed on an imager connected to your PC's COM port. Visual
Xpress allows you to download upgrades to the imager's firmware, change pro-
grammed parameters, and create and print programming bar codes. Using
Visual Xpress, you can even save/open the programming parameters for an
imager. This saved file can be e-mailed or, if required, you can create a single
bar code that contains all the customized programming parameters and mail or
fax that bar code to any location. Users in other locations can scan the bar
code to load in the customized programming.
To communicate with an imager, Visual Xpress requires that the PC have at
least one available serial communication port, or a serial port emulation using a
physical USB port. If you are using the serial port and RS-232 cable, an exter-
nal power supply is required. When using a USB serial port emulation, only a
USB cable is required.
Visual Xpress Operations
The Visual Xpress software performs the following operations:
Exit
Non-Advanced
Illumination Unit Advanced
Illumination Unit
11 - 5
Scan Data
Scan Data allows you to scan bar codes and display the bar code data in a win-
dow. Scan Data lets you send serial commands to the imager and receive
imager response that can be seen in the Scan Data window. The data dis-
played in the Scan Data window can either be saved in a file or printed.
Configure
Configure displays the programming and configuration data of the imager. The
imager's programming and configuration data is grouped into different catego-
ries. Each category is displayed as a tree item under the "Configure" tree node
in the application explorer. When one of these tree nodes is clicked, the right-
hand side is loaded with the parameters' form belonging to that particular cate-
gory. The "Configure" tree option has all the programming and configuration
parameters specified for an imager. You can set or modify these parameters as
required. You can later write the modified settings to the imager, or save them
to a dcf file.
Imaging
Imaging provides all the image-related functions that a 2D imager can perform.
You can capture an image using the current settings, and the image will be dis-
played in an image window. Images captured from the imager can be saved to
files in different image formats. You can modify the image settings and save the
image settings to an INI file, which can be loaded later to capture new images.
Imaging also lets you preview the images continuously captured by the imager.
Installing Visual Xpress from the Web
Note: Visual Xpress requires .NET software. If .NET is not installed on your PC,
you will be prompted to install it during the Visual Xpress installation.
1. Access the Honeywell web site at www.honeywellaidc.com.
2. Click on the Resources tab. Select Product Downloads-Software.
3. Click on the dropdown for Select Product Number. Click on 4600g.
4. Click on the listing for Visual Xpress.
5. When prompted, select Save File, and save the files to the
c:\windows\temp directory.
6. Once you have finished downloading the file, exit the web site.
7. Using Explorer, go to the c:\windows\temp file and unzip the file you saved.
8. Double click on Setup.exe and follow the screen prompts to install the
Visual Xpress program.
9. If you’ve selected the defaults during installation, you can click on Start
Menu-All Programs-Hand Held Products-Visual Xpress.
11 - 6
Quick*View
Quick*View is a Microsoft Windows® program that displays decoded symbol
messages and captures images (for instance, ID photographs) from the imager.
Bar Code information and images are displayed in the Quick*View window.
Installing Quick*View from the Web
1. Access the Honeywell web site at www.honeywellaidc.com.
2. Click on the Resources tab. Select Product Downloads-Software.
3. Click on the dropdown for Select Product Number. Click on 4600g.
4. Click on the listing for Quick*View Software Utility.
5. When prompted, select Save, and save the files to the c:\windows\temp
directory.
6. Once you have finished downloading the file, exit the web site.
7. Using Explorer, go to the c:\windows\temp file.
8. Double click on the Quickview.exe file. Follow the screen prompts to install
the Quick*View program.
9. To start Quick*View, from the Start Menu click on All Programs-
Quick*View-Quick*View.
Note: If you wish, you can create a shortcut to the Quick*View executable on
your desktop.
Temporary Quick*View Configuration
For a quick download communication configuration, scan the Quick*View bar
code and the imager will be temporarily configured for Quick*View settings.
Note: If you have a unit capable of keyboard wedge mode, scan the bar code
below and the unit will communicate in RS-232 mode, allowing it to work
with Quick*View. To convert the imager back to keyboard wedge
communication, cycle the power.
Quick*View
12 - 1
12
Serial Programming Commands
The serial programming commands can be used in place of the programming
bar codes. Both the serial commands and the programming bar codes will pro-
gram your imager. For complete descriptions and examples of each serial pro-
gramming command, refer to the corresponding programming bar code in this
manual.
The device must be set to an RS-232 interface (see page 1-11). The following
commands can be sent via a PC COM port using terminal emulation software.
Conventions
The following conventions are used for menu and query command descriptions:
parameter
A label representing the actual value you should send as part of a
command.
[
option
] An optional part of a command.
{Data} Alternatives in a command.
bold Names of menus, menu commands, buttons, dialog boxes, and
windows that appear on the screen.
Menu Command Syntax
Menu commands have the following syntax (spaces have been used for clarity
only):
Prefix Tag SubTag {Data} [, SubTag {Data}] [; Tag SubTag {Data}] […] Storage
Prefix Three ASCII characters: SYN M CR (ASCII 22,77,13).
Tag A 3 character case-insensitive field that identifies the desired menu
command group. For example, all RS-232 configuration settings
are identified with a Tag of 232.
SubTag A 3 character case-insensitive field that identifies the desired menu
command within the tag group. For example, the SubTag for the
RS-232 baud rate is BAD.
Data The new value for a menu setting, identified by the Tag and Sub-
Tag.
Storage A single character that specifies the storage table to which the
command is applied. An exclamation point (!) performs the com-
mand’s operation on the device’s volatile menu configuration table.
A period (.) performs the command’s operation on the device’s
non-volatile menu configuration table. Use the non-volatile table
only for semi-permanent changes you want saved through a power
cycle.
12 - 2
Query Commands
Several special characters can be used to query the device about its settings.
^What is the default value for the setting(s).
?What is the device’s current value for the setting(s).
*What is the range of possible values for the setting(s). (The de-
vice’s response uses a dash (-) to indicate a continuous range of
values. A pipe (|) separates items in a list of non-continuous val-
ues.)
Tag Field Usage
When a query is used in place of a Tag field, the query applies to the
entire
set
of commands available for the particular storage table indicated by the Storage
field of the command. In this case, the SubTag and Data fields should not be
used because they are ignored by the device.
SubTag Field Usage
When a query is used in place of a SubTag field, the query applies only to the
subset of commands available that match the Tag field. In this case, the Data
field should not be used because it is ignored by the device.
Data Field Usage
When a query is used in place of the Data field, the query applies only to the
specific command identified by the Tag and SubTag fields.
Concatenation of Multiple Commands
Multiple commands can be issued within one Prefix/Storage sequence. Only
the Tag, SubTag, and Data fields must be repeated for each command in the
sequence. If additional commands are to be applied to the same Tag, then the
new command sequence is separated with a comma (,) and only the SubTag
and Data fields of the additional command are issued. If the additional com-
mand requires a different Tag field, the command is separated from previous
commands by a semicolon (;).
Responses
The device responds to serial commands with one of three responses:
ACK Indicates a good command which has been processed.
ENQ Indicates an invalid Tag or SubTag command.
NAK Indicates the command was good, but the Data field entry was out of the
allowable range for this Tag and SubTag combination, e.g., an entry for a
minimum message length of 100 when the field will only accept 2 charac-
ters.
When responding, the device echoes back the command sequence with the
status character inserted directly before each of the punctuation marks (the
period, exclamation point, comma, or semicolon) in the command.
12 - 3
Examples of Query Commands
In the following examples, a bracketed notation [ ] depicts a non-displayable
response.
Example #1:What is the range of possible values for Codabar Coding Enable?
Enter: cbrena*.
Response: CBRENA0-1[ACK]
This response indicates that Codabar Coding Enable (CBRENA) has a range of
values from 0 to 1 (off and on).
Example #2: What is the default value for Codabar Coding Enable?
Enter: cbrena^.
Response: CBRENA1[ACK]
This response indicates that the default setting for Codabar Coding Enable
(CBRENA) is 1, or on.
Example #3: What is the device’s current setting for Codabar Coding Enable?
Enter: cbrena?.
Response: CBRENA1[ACK]
This response indicates that the devices Codabar Coding Enable (CBRENA) is
set to 1, or on.
Example #4: What are the device’s settings for all Codabar selections?
Enter: cbr?.
Response: CBRENA1[ACK],
SSX0[ACK],
CK20[ACK],
CCT1[ACK],
MIN2[ACK],
MAX60[ACK],
DFT[ACK].
This response indicates that the devices Codabar Coding Enable (CBRENA) is
set to 1, or on;
the Start/Stop Character (SSX) is set to 0, or Don’t Transmit;
the Check Character (CK2) is set to 0, or Not Required;
concatenation (CCT) is set to 1, or Enabled;
the Minimum Message Length (MIN) is set to 2 characters;
the Maximum Message Length (MAX) is set to 60 characters;
and the Default setting (DFT) has no value.
12 - 4
Trigger Commands
You can activate and deactivate the imager with serial trigger commands. First,
the imager must be put in Manual/Serial Trigger Mode either by scanning the
Manual/Serial Trigger Mode bar code (page 3-4), or by sending the Manual/
Serial Menu Command (page 12-9). Once the imager is in serial trigger mode,
the trigger is activated and deactivated by sending the following commands:
Activate: SYN T CR
Deactivate: SYN U CR
The imager scans until a bar code has been read, until the deactivate command
is sent, or until the serial time-out has been reached (see "Read Time-Out" on
page 3-4 for a description, and the serial command on page 12-9).
Resetting the Standard Product Defaults
If you aren’t sure what programming options are in your imager, or you’ve
changed some options and want the factory settings restored, scan the Stan-
dard Product Default Settings bar code below.
The chart on the following pages lists the factory default settings for each of the
menu commands (indicated by an asterisk (*) on the programming pages).
Menu Commands
Note: Not all menu commands apply to all imager models.
Selection Setting
* Indicates default
Serial
Command
# Indicates a
numeric entry
Page
Factory Default
Settings
Default DEFALT 12-4
Terminal Interfaces
Terminal ID 000 (4600g/4600r/4600rp/
4800i 030 models)
124 (4600g/4600r/4600rp/
4800i 050 models)
TERMID### 2-1
Standard Product Default Settings
12 - 5
Program
Keyboard
Country
*U.S.A. KBDCTY0 2-4
Belgium KBDCTY1 2-4
Brazil KBDCTY16 2-4
Canada (French) KBDCTY18 2-4
Czech Republic KBDCTY15 2-4
Denmark KBDCTY8 2-4
Finland (Sweden) KBDCTY2 2-4
France KBDCTY3 2-4
Germany/Austria KBDCTY4 2-4
Greece KBDCTY17 2-4
Hungary KBDCTY19 2-4
Israel (Hebrew) KBDCTY12 2-4
Italy KBDCTY5 2-5
Latin America KBDCTY14 2-5
Netherlands (Dutch) KBDCTY11 2-5
Norway KBDCTY9 2-5
Poland KBDCTY20 2-5
Portugal KBDCTY13 2-5
Romania KBDCTY25 2-5
Russia KBDCTY26 2-5
SCS KBDCTY21 2-5
Slovakia KBDCTY22 2-5
Spain KBDCTY10 2-5
Sweden KBDCTY23 2-5
Switzerland (German) KBDCTY6 2-5
Turkey F KBDCTY27 2-6
Turkey Q KBDCTY24 2-6
U.K. KBDCTY7 2-6
Selection Setting
* Indicates default
Serial
Command
# Indicates a
numeric entry
Page
12 - 6
Keyboard Style *Regular KBDSTY0 2-6
Caps Lock KBDSTY1 2-6
Shift Lock KBDSTY2 2-7
Automatic Caps Lock KBDSTY6 2-7
Emulate External
Keyboard
KBDSTY5 2-7
Keyboard
Modifiers
*Control + ASCII Off KBDCAS0 2-8
DOS Mode Control + ASCII KBDCAS1 2-8
Windows Mode Control +
ASCII
KBDCAS2 2-8
*Turbo Mode Off KBDTMD0 2-8
Turbo Mode On KBDTMD1 2-8
*Numeric Keypad Off KBDNPS0 2-8
Numeric Keypad On KBDNPS1 2-8
*Auto Direct Conn. Off KBDADC0 2-9
Auto Direct Conn. On KBDADC1 2-9
Baud Rate 300 BPS 232BAD0 2-10
600 BPS 232BAD1 2-10
1200 BPS 232BAD2 2-10
2400 BPS 232BAD3 2-10
4800 B